Calmodulins and Calcineurin B–like Proteins Calcium Sensors for Specific Signal Response Coupling in Plants

Calmodulins and Calcineurin B–like Proteins Calcium Sensors for Specific Signal Response... Calcium Signaling and Calcium Sensors: A General Paradigm Many extracellular signals, including light, biotic, and abiotic stress factors, elicit changes in cellular Ca 2+ concentration in plants (Trewavas and Knight, 1994 ; Bush, 1995 ; Braam et al., 1997 ; McAinsh et al., 1997 ; Sanders et al., 1999 ; Rudd and Franklin-Tong, 2001 ). In addition, many intrinsic growth and developmental processes, such as elongation of root hairs and pollen tube formation, are controlled by Ca 2+ transients (Felle and Hepler, 1997 ; Holdaway-Clarke et al., 1997 ; Wymer et al., 1997 ). Because different signals often elicit distinct and specific cellular responses, it is important to determine how cells can distinguish the Ca 2+ signals produced by different stimuli. Recent studies in both animal and plant cells suggest that a Ca 2+ signal is presented not only by the concentration of Ca 2+ but also by its spatial and temporal information (Franklin-Tong et al., 1996 ; Holdaway-Clarke et al., 1997 ; Dolmetsch et al., 1998 ; Li et al., 1998 ; Trewavas, 1999 ). A combination of changes in all Ca 2+ parameters produced by a particular signal is referred to as a "Ca 2+ signature." http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Calmodulins and Calcineurin B–like Proteins Calcium Sensors for Specific Signal Response Coupling in Plants

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-society-of-plant-biologist/calmodulins-and-calcineurin-b-like-proteins-calcium-sensors-for-LF8PJ1fdBb
Publisher
American Society of Plant Biologist
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Plant Biologists
ISSN
1040-4651
eISSN
1532-298X
D.O.I.
10.1105/tpc.001115
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Calcium Signaling and Calcium Sensors: A General Paradigm Many extracellular signals, including light, biotic, and abiotic stress factors, elicit changes in cellular Ca 2+ concentration in plants (Trewavas and Knight, 1994 ; Bush, 1995 ; Braam et al., 1997 ; McAinsh et al., 1997 ; Sanders et al., 1999 ; Rudd and Franklin-Tong, 2001 ). In addition, many intrinsic growth and developmental processes, such as elongation of root hairs and pollen tube formation, are controlled by Ca 2+ transients (Felle and Hepler, 1997 ; Holdaway-Clarke et al., 1997 ; Wymer et al., 1997 ). Because different signals often elicit distinct and specific cellular responses, it is important to determine how cells can distinguish the Ca 2+ signals produced by different stimuli. Recent studies in both animal and plant cells suggest that a Ca 2+ signal is presented not only by the concentration of Ca 2+ but also by its spatial and temporal information (Franklin-Tong et al., 1996 ; Holdaway-Clarke et al., 1997 ; Dolmetsch et al., 1998 ; Li et al., 1998 ; Trewavas, 1999 ). A combination of changes in all Ca 2+ parameters produced by a particular signal is referred to as a "Ca 2+ signature."

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off