Public support for National Health Insurance.

Public support for National Health Insurance. Public support for National Health Insurance. L J Goodman and S R Steiber In 1978 a majority of the American public felt there was a need for National Health Insurance (NHI). This study develops models of public support for NHI both with and without a tax subsidy. Support for NHI is highest among the young, lower socioeconomic groups, non-Whites, and urbanites. The older, more educated, White, and rural population are less supportive. In addition, substantial differences exist across political party orientation and health insurance status. Although support for NHI declines by considering a tax subsidy, logit estimates remain relatively stable. Only age and socioeconomic status lose statistical significance when the tax issue is considered. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Public Health American Public Health Association

Public support for National Health Insurance.

American Journal of Public Health, Volume 71 (10): 1105 – Oct 1, 1981

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Publisher
American Public Health Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1981 by the American Public Health Association
ISSN
0090-0036
eISSN
1541-0048
DOI
10.2105/AJPH.71.10.1105
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Public support for National Health Insurance. L J Goodman and S R Steiber In 1978 a majority of the American public felt there was a need for National Health Insurance (NHI). This study develops models of public support for NHI both with and without a tax subsidy. Support for NHI is highest among the young, lower socioeconomic groups, non-Whites, and urbanites. The older, more educated, White, and rural population are less supportive. In addition, substantial differences exist across political party orientation and health insurance status. Although support for NHI declines by considering a tax subsidy, logit estimates remain relatively stable. Only age and socioeconomic status lose statistical significance when the tax issue is considered.

Journal

American Journal of Public HealthAmerican Public Health Association

Published: Oct 1, 1981

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