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With service in mind: Concepts and models for service-learning in psychology.Service-learning and psychology: Lessons from the psychology of volunteers' motivations.

With service in mind: Concepts and models for service-learning in psychology.: Service-learning... In this chapter, we will discuss our program of research on voluntarism, focusing on the motivational dynamics underlying participation in volunteer service, and we will consider some of the implications of our research for service-learning experiences and programs. Our examination of these issues is guided by two overall considerations drawn from our framework for understanding the motivations of volunteers. First, we will argue that it is critical that prosocial values and attitudes, which tend to emphasize the concerns and needs of others, are also linked to people's own self-interests and individual concerns. Our conceptualization of volunteers' motivation, thus, is compatible with, and indeed fleshes out, the service-learning notion that community service is a reciprocal arrangement that is beneficial for both the helper and recipient. Second, we will assert that prosocial values are most effectively established at the "back-end" rather than at the "front-end" of the transmission process; this is in keeping with the service-learning principle of action-reflection. Thus, our perspective should be directly applicable to classroom settings as it offers a conceptual map for students to reflect on and understand their own motivations and behaviors relevant to community service. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

With service in mind: Concepts and models for service-learning in psychology.Service-learning and psychology: Lessons from the psychology of volunteers' motivations.

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 American Psychological Association
Pages
35–50
DOI
10.1037/10505-002
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this chapter, we will discuss our program of research on voluntarism, focusing on the motivational dynamics underlying participation in volunteer service, and we will consider some of the implications of our research for service-learning experiences and programs. Our examination of these issues is guided by two overall considerations drawn from our framework for understanding the motivations of volunteers. First, we will argue that it is critical that prosocial values and attitudes, which tend to emphasize the concerns and needs of others, are also linked to people's own self-interests and individual concerns. Our conceptualization of volunteers' motivation, thus, is compatible with, and indeed fleshes out, the service-learning notion that community service is a reciprocal arrangement that is beneficial for both the helper and recipient. Second, we will assert that prosocial values are most effectively established at the "back-end" rather than at the "front-end" of the transmission process; this is in keeping with the service-learning principle of action-reflection. Thus, our perspective should be directly applicable to classroom settings as it offers a conceptual map for students to reflect on and understand their own motivations and behaviors relevant to community service. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

Published: Aug 31, 2004

Keywords: prosocial values; motivational dynamics; voluntarism; service-learning; psychology; volunteers

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