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Understanding and assessing nonverbal expressiveness: The Affective Communication Test

Understanding and assessing nonverbal expressiveness: The Affective Communication Test 577 undergraduates participated in an investigation of the concept of nonverbal emotional expressiveness. Ss were administered a 13-item self-report Affective Communication Test (ACT) and a battery of other tests, including the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale, Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale, Rotter's Internal–External Locus of Control Scale, and Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory. Results show the ACT to be a reliable and valid measure of individual differences in expressiveness/charisma, which is (a) a likely element of social influence in face-to-face interaction, (b) a logical extension of past approaches to a basic element of personality (exhibition), and (c) a valuable construct in approaching current problems in nonverbal communication research. (46 ref) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Personality and Social Psychology American Psychological Association

Understanding and assessing nonverbal expressiveness: The Affective Communication Test

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1980 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0022-3514
eISSN
1939-1315
DOI
10.1037/0022-3514.39.2.333
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

577 undergraduates participated in an investigation of the concept of nonverbal emotional expressiveness. Ss were administered a 13-item self-report Affective Communication Test (ACT) and a battery of other tests, including the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale, Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale, Rotter's Internal–External Locus of Control Scale, and Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory. Results show the ACT to be a reliable and valid measure of individual differences in expressiveness/charisma, which is (a) a likely element of social influence in face-to-face interaction, (b) a logical extension of past approaches to a basic element of personality (exhibition), and (c) a valuable construct in approaching current problems in nonverbal communication research. (46 ref)

Journal

Journal of Personality and Social PsychologyAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Aug 1, 1980

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