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The Role of Age in the Perceptions of Politics - Job Performance Relationship: A Three-Study Constructive Replication

The Role of Age in the Perceptions of Politics - Job Performance Relationship: A Three-Study... This research examined the interaction of organizational politics perceptions and employee age on job performance in 3 studies. On the basis of conservation of resources theory, the authors predicted that perceptions of politics would demonstrate their most detrimental effects on job performance for older workers. Results across the 3 studies provided strong support for the hypothesis that increases in politics perceptions are associated with decreases in job performance for older employees and that perceptions of politics do not affect younger employees' performance. Implications of these results, strengths and limitations, and directions for future research are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Psychology American Psychological Association

The Role of Age in the Perceptions of Politics - Job Performance Relationship: A Three-Study Constructive Replication

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0021-9010
eISSN
1939-1854
DOI
10.1037/0021-9010.90.5.872
pmid
16162060
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This research examined the interaction of organizational politics perceptions and employee age on job performance in 3 studies. On the basis of conservation of resources theory, the authors predicted that perceptions of politics would demonstrate their most detrimental effects on job performance for older workers. Results across the 3 studies provided strong support for the hypothesis that increases in politics perceptions are associated with decreases in job performance for older employees and that perceptions of politics do not affect younger employees' performance. Implications of these results, strengths and limitations, and directions for future research are discussed.

Journal

Journal of Applied PsychologyAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Sep 1, 2005

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