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The Effects of Feedback Interventions on Performance: A Historical Review, a Meta-Analysis, and a Preliminary Feedback Intervention Theory

The Effects of Feedback Interventions on Performance: A Historical Review, a Meta-Analysis, and a... Since the beginning of the century, feedback interventions (FIs) producednegative–but largely ignored–effects on performance. A meta-analysis (607effect sizes; 23, 663 observations) suggests that FIs improved performance on average(d =.41) but that over 1/3 of the FIs decreased performance. This findingcannot be explained by sampling error, feedback sign, or existing theories. The authorsproposed a preliminary FI theory (FIT) and tested it with moderator analyses. The centralassumption of FIT is that FIs change the locus of attention among 3 general and hierarchicallyorganized levels of control: task learning, task motivation, and meta-tasks (includingself-related) processes. The results suggest that FI effectiveness decreases as attention movesup the hierarchy closer to the self and away from the task. These findings are furthermoderated by task characteristics that are still poorly understood. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychological Bulletin American Psychological Association

The Effects of Feedback Interventions on Performance: A Historical Review, a Meta-Analysis, and a Preliminary Feedback Intervention Theory

Psychological Bulletin , Volume 119 (2): 31 – Mar 1, 1996

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References (288)

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0033-2909
eISSN
1939-1455
DOI
10.1037/0033-2909.119.2.254
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Since the beginning of the century, feedback interventions (FIs) producednegative–but largely ignored–effects on performance. A meta-analysis (607effect sizes; 23, 663 observations) suggests that FIs improved performance on average(d =.41) but that over 1/3 of the FIs decreased performance. This findingcannot be explained by sampling error, feedback sign, or existing theories. The authorsproposed a preliminary FI theory (FIT) and tested it with moderator analyses. The centralassumption of FIT is that FIs change the locus of attention among 3 general and hierarchicallyorganized levels of control: task learning, task motivation, and meta-tasks (includingself-related) processes. The results suggest that FI effectiveness decreases as attention movesup the hierarchy closer to the self and away from the task. These findings are furthermoderated by task characteristics that are still poorly understood.

Journal

Psychological BulletinAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Mar 1, 1996

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