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Temporality in Human Action

Temporality in Human Action Two distinguishable explanatory systems characterize current psychology. Positivism achieves certainty through atemporal causality as borrowed from the natural sciences. Historicism rejects this notion of causality but retains the traditional notion of the atemporal nature of certainty. Because of this stance, historicist psychologies have not been able to provide a genuine alternative to positivism. These two views, because of their common conception of atemporality as the foundation of certainty, and because of their conflation of intelligibility with certainty, are founded on the same metaphysical ground. It is argued that a genuine alternative to the shared problems of positivism and historicism must begin with a radical departure from the received view of lineal time. From the point of view of the works of Martin Heidegger and Hans-Georg Gadamer, it is argued that intelligibility in the human world is possible without atemporal causality. Temporality is the proper and productive grounding for the human sciences. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Psychologist American Psychological Association

Temporality in Human Action

American Psychologist , Volume 40 (11): 10 – Nov 1, 1985

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1985 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0003-066x
eISSN
1935-990X
DOI
10.1037/0003-066X.40.11.1179
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Two distinguishable explanatory systems characterize current psychology. Positivism achieves certainty through atemporal causality as borrowed from the natural sciences. Historicism rejects this notion of causality but retains the traditional notion of the atemporal nature of certainty. Because of this stance, historicist psychologies have not been able to provide a genuine alternative to positivism. These two views, because of their common conception of atemporality as the foundation of certainty, and because of their conflation of intelligibility with certainty, are founded on the same metaphysical ground. It is argued that a genuine alternative to the shared problems of positivism and historicism must begin with a radical departure from the received view of lineal time. From the point of view of the works of Martin Heidegger and Hans-Georg Gadamer, it is argued that intelligibility in the human world is possible without atemporal causality. Temporality is the proper and productive grounding for the human sciences.

Journal

American PsychologistAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Nov 1, 1985

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