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Schema Training in Analogical Reasoning

Schema Training in Analogical Reasoning In 3 experiments, college students learned how to solve 20 verbal analogy problems and took transfer and memory tests. Subjects learned from worked-out examples that emphasized relational terms such as “part-to-whole” or under 3 other instructional conditions that required responding to examples or that excluded mention of relational terms. The former subjects were more accurate and faster then other subjects on solving new problems involving the same relations but less accurate in recognizing words from previous problems. This pattern is inconsistent with active responding theory, which predicts students learn best by generating answers and receiving feedback to problems, and is consistent with active learning theory, which predicts that students learn best by inducing schemas for particular problem types. Results indicate that schema induction is maximized when the schemas are made salient and the cognitive system is not overloaded. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Educational Psychology American Psychological Association

Schema Training in Analogical Reasoning

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References (27)

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1993 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0022-0663
eISSN
1939-2176
DOI
10.1037/0022-0663.85.3.529
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In 3 experiments, college students learned how to solve 20 verbal analogy problems and took transfer and memory tests. Subjects learned from worked-out examples that emphasized relational terms such as “part-to-whole” or under 3 other instructional conditions that required responding to examples or that excluded mention of relational terms. The former subjects were more accurate and faster then other subjects on solving new problems involving the same relations but less accurate in recognizing words from previous problems. This pattern is inconsistent with active responding theory, which predicts students learn best by generating answers and receiving feedback to problems, and is consistent with active learning theory, which predicts that students learn best by inducing schemas for particular problem types. Results indicate that schema induction is maximized when the schemas are made salient and the cognitive system is not overloaded.

Journal

Journal of Educational PsychologyAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Sep 1, 1993

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