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Perceived Organizational Support: A Review of the Literature

Perceived Organizational Support: A Review of the Literature The authors reviewed more than 70 studies concerning employees’ general belief that their work organization values their contribution and cares about their well-being (perceived organizational support; POS). A meta-analysis indicated that 3 major categories of beneficial treatment received by employees (i.e., fairness, supervisor support, and organizational rewards and favorable job conditions) were associated with POS. POS, in turn, was related to outcomes favorable to employees (e.g., job satisfaction, positive mood) and the organization (e.g., affective commitment, performance, and lessened withdrawal behavior). These relationships depended on processes assumed by organizational support theory: employees’ belief that the organization’s actions were discretionary, feeling of obligation to aid the organization, fulfillment of socioemotional needs, and performance-reward expectancies. To whom much is given, much will be required. —Luke 12:48 (New King James Version) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Psychology American Psychological Association

Perceived Organizational Support: A Review of the Literature

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References (102)

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0021-9010
eISSN
1939-1854
DOI
10.1037/0021-9010.87.4.698
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The authors reviewed more than 70 studies concerning employees’ general belief that their work organization values their contribution and cares about their well-being (perceived organizational support; POS). A meta-analysis indicated that 3 major categories of beneficial treatment received by employees (i.e., fairness, supervisor support, and organizational rewards and favorable job conditions) were associated with POS. POS, in turn, was related to outcomes favorable to employees (e.g., job satisfaction, positive mood) and the organization (e.g., affective commitment, performance, and lessened withdrawal behavior). These relationships depended on processes assumed by organizational support theory: employees’ belief that the organization’s actions were discretionary, feeling of obligation to aid the organization, fulfillment of socioemotional needs, and performance-reward expectancies. To whom much is given, much will be required. —Luke 12:48 (New King James Version)

Journal

Journal of Applied PsychologyAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Aug 1, 2002

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