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Individual differences in infant responses to brief, everyday separations as related to other infant and maternal behaviors

Individual differences in infant responses to brief, everyday separations as related to other... Studied infant responses to separation from and reunion with the mother. Ss were 26 infant (9-12 mo)-mother pairs. Separation protest was associated with maternal unresponsiveness to crying and to maternal insensitivity to infant signals. Protest was also related to crying when put down and crying in general. Positive greeting was related negatively to the crying measures but positively to following upon separation and with positive responses to being held and put down. These findings, supported by a factor analysis, suggest a security-insecurity dimension in the organization of attachment behaviors toward the mother. (20 ref.) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Developmental Psychology American Psychological Association

Individual differences in infant responses to brief, everyday separations as related to other infant and maternal behaviors

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1973 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0012-1649
eISSN
1939-0599
DOI
10.1037/h0035089
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Studied infant responses to separation from and reunion with the mother. Ss were 26 infant (9-12 mo)-mother pairs. Separation protest was associated with maternal unresponsiveness to crying and to maternal insensitivity to infant signals. Protest was also related to crying when put down and crying in general. Positive greeting was related negatively to the crying measures but positively to following upon separation and with positive responses to being held and put down. These findings, supported by a factor analysis, suggest a security-insecurity dimension in the organization of attachment behaviors toward the mother. (20 ref.)

Journal

Developmental PsychologyAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Sep 1, 1973

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