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Gender and the Emergence of Leaders: A Meta-Analysis

Gender and the Emergence of Leaders: A Meta-Analysis In this article, research is reviewed on the emergence of male and female leaders ininitially leaderless groups. In these laboratory and field studies, men emerged as leaders to agreater extent than did women. Male leadership was particularly likely in short-term groups andin groups carrying out tasks that did not require complex social interaction. In contrast,women emerged as social leaders slightly more than did men. These and other findings wereinterpreted in terms of gender role theory, which maintains that societal gender rolesinfluence group behavior. According to this theory, sex differences in emergent leadership aredue primarily to role-induced tendencies for men to specialize more than women in behaviorsstrictly oriented to their group's task and for women to specialize more than men in sociallyfacilitative behaviors. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Personality and Social Psychology American Psychological Association

Gender and the Emergence of Leaders: A Meta-Analysis

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References (124)

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0022-3514
eISSN
1939-1315
DOI
10.1037/0022-3514.60.5.685
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this article, research is reviewed on the emergence of male and female leaders ininitially leaderless groups. In these laboratory and field studies, men emerged as leaders to agreater extent than did women. Male leadership was particularly likely in short-term groups andin groups carrying out tasks that did not require complex social interaction. In contrast,women emerged as social leaders slightly more than did men. These and other findings wereinterpreted in terms of gender role theory, which maintains that societal gender rolesinfluence group behavior. According to this theory, sex differences in emergent leadership aredue primarily to role-induced tendencies for men to specialize more than women in behaviorsstrictly oriented to their group's task and for women to specialize more than men in sociallyfacilitative behaviors.

Journal

Journal of Personality and Social PsychologyAmerican Psychological Association

Published: May 1, 1991

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