Constellations of Family Risk for Long-Term Adolescent Antisocial Behavior

Constellations of Family Risk for Long-Term Adolescent Antisocial Behavior Adolescent antisocial behavior (ASB) can have long-term individual and societal consequences. Much of the research on the development of ASB considers risk and protective factors in isolation or as cumulative indices, likely overlooking the co-occurring and interacting nature of these factors. Guided by theories of ASB risk (i.e., coercive family process, disengagement), this study uses latent profile analysis to evaluate whether there are subgroups of families in the population that conform to specific constellations of risk factors prescribed by established theories of risk for ASB, and whether subgroup membership confers differential risk for different ASBs. We leveraged a large sample of adolescents in Fall, Grade 6 (N = 5,300; Mage = 11.8; 50.9% female) for subgroup analysis, and predicted aggression, antisocial peer behavior, and substance use in Spring, Grade 8. Four family profiles were identified: Coercive (15%), characterized by high family conflict, low positive family climate, low parental involvement, low effective discipline, low adolescent positive engagement, and low parental knowledge; Disengaged (41%), characterized by low positive family climate, low parental involvement, low adolescent positive engagement, and low parental knowledge; Permissive (11%), characterized by high parental involvement, low effective discipline, high adolescent positive engagement, high parental knowledge, and high family conflict; and High Functioning (34% prevalence). In turn, group membership predicted long-term outcomes. Adolescents in Coercive families were at highest risk for ASB during Grade 8, followed by those in Disengaged and Permissive profiles; all three of which were at greater risk than adolescents in High Functioning families for every outcome. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Family Psychology American Psychological Association

Constellations of Family Risk for Long-Term Adolescent Antisocial Behavior

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-psychological-association/constellations-of-family-risk-for-long-term-adolescent-antisocial-7hloUmjJGS
Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
© 2020 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0893-3200
eISSN
1939-1293
DOI
10.1037/fam0000640
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Adolescent antisocial behavior (ASB) can have long-term individual and societal consequences. Much of the research on the development of ASB considers risk and protective factors in isolation or as cumulative indices, likely overlooking the co-occurring and interacting nature of these factors. Guided by theories of ASB risk (i.e., coercive family process, disengagement), this study uses latent profile analysis to evaluate whether there are subgroups of families in the population that conform to specific constellations of risk factors prescribed by established theories of risk for ASB, and whether subgroup membership confers differential risk for different ASBs. We leveraged a large sample of adolescents in Fall, Grade 6 (N = 5,300; Mage = 11.8; 50.9% female) for subgroup analysis, and predicted aggression, antisocial peer behavior, and substance use in Spring, Grade 8. Four family profiles were identified: Coercive (15%), characterized by high family conflict, low positive family climate, low parental involvement, low effective discipline, low adolescent positive engagement, and low parental knowledge; Disengaged (41%), characterized by low positive family climate, low parental involvement, low adolescent positive engagement, and low parental knowledge; Permissive (11%), characterized by high parental involvement, low effective discipline, high adolescent positive engagement, high parental knowledge, and high family conflict; and High Functioning (34% prevalence). In turn, group membership predicted long-term outcomes. Adolescents in Coercive families were at highest risk for ASB during Grade 8, followed by those in Disengaged and Permissive profiles; all three of which were at greater risk than adolescents in High Functioning families for every outcome.

Journal

Journal of Family PsychologyAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Feb 13, 2020

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off