Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A study in phonetic symbolism

A study in phonetic symbolism There are two forms of phonetic symbolism: associative or referential, and phonic or expressive. The object of this study is "to discover if there tends to be a feeling of the symbolic magnitude value of certain differences in vowels and consonants, regardless of the particular associations due to the presence of these vowels and consonants in meaningful words in the language of the speaker." The main experiment showed that 464 high school students ascribed large size to nonsense words containing the vowel a, in distinction to smaller or small size to similar words containing the vowel i in over 80% of the cases of the various age groups. There is slight difference in this respect in age groups from 11 years to adult. This symbolism of sound for size is shown to be scalar in a further part of the paper, and is not due to any actual word associations of the language. Two theories are proposed: (1) acoustically, certain vowels have greater "volume" than others; (2) kinesthetically, the one "spatially extended gesture" (i.e., tongue position and resonance cavity) is symbolic of a larger reference. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Experimental Psychology: General American Psychological Association

A study in phonetic symbolism

Journal of Experimental Psychology: General , Volume 12 (3): 15 – Jun 1, 1929

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-psychological-association/a-study-in-phonetic-symbolism-FNZV5CKL56

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1929 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0096-3445
eISSN
1939-2222
DOI
10.1037/h0070931
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There are two forms of phonetic symbolism: associative or referential, and phonic or expressive. The object of this study is "to discover if there tends to be a feeling of the symbolic magnitude value of certain differences in vowels and consonants, regardless of the particular associations due to the presence of these vowels and consonants in meaningful words in the language of the speaker." The main experiment showed that 464 high school students ascribed large size to nonsense words containing the vowel a, in distinction to smaller or small size to similar words containing the vowel i in over 80% of the cases of the various age groups. There is slight difference in this respect in age groups from 11 years to adult. This symbolism of sound for size is shown to be scalar in a further part of the paper, and is not due to any actual word associations of the language. Two theories are proposed: (1) acoustically, certain vowels have greater "volume" than others; (2) kinesthetically, the one "spatially extended gesture" (i.e., tongue position and resonance cavity) is symbolic of a larger reference.

Journal

Journal of Experimental Psychology: GeneralAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Jun 1, 1929

There are no references for this article.