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A psychological investigation of the likelihood of confusion between the words \"Coca-Cola' and \"Chero Cola'

A psychological investigation of the likelihood of confusion between the words \"Coca-Cola' and... Reports an investigation on the deceptive similarity in visual appearance and in sound between the word trade marks "Coca-Cola' and "Chero-Cola'. Four experiments (three with recognition and one with relative position) were conducted on 90 Ss, aged 20-45 yrs. The word "Chero-Cola' showed a likelihood of visual confusion with the word "Coca-Cola'. Most of the Ss put the greatest confidence in their wrong recognitions. The confusion in visual recognition caused by "Chero-Cola' was greater than that caused by the imitation of other three very well-known original trade-marks. In the relative position experiment "Coca-Cola - Chero-Cola' were in the third most confusing position in the list of 10 pairs of litigated trade-marks. Concludes that not only did similarity in visual appearance, but also in sound, linguistic formation and meaning or significance contribute to confusion. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Psychology American Psychological Association

A psychological investigation of the likelihood of confusion between the words \"Coca-Cola' and \"Chero Cola'

Journal of Applied Psychology , Volume 3 (4): 23 – Dec 1, 1919

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright ©
ISSN
0021-9010
eISSN
1939-1854
DOI
10.1037/h0073713
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Reports an investigation on the deceptive similarity in visual appearance and in sound between the word trade marks "Coca-Cola' and "Chero-Cola'. Four experiments (three with recognition and one with relative position) were conducted on 90 Ss, aged 20-45 yrs. The word "Chero-Cola' showed a likelihood of visual confusion with the word "Coca-Cola'. Most of the Ss put the greatest confidence in their wrong recognitions. The confusion in visual recognition caused by "Chero-Cola' was greater than that caused by the imitation of other three very well-known original trade-marks. In the relative position experiment "Coca-Cola - Chero-Cola' were in the third most confusing position in the list of 10 pairs of litigated trade-marks. Concludes that not only did similarity in visual appearance, but also in sound, linguistic formation and meaning or significance contribute to confusion.

Journal

Journal of Applied PsychologyAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Dec 1, 1919

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