Teenage Helper: A Role in Community Mental Health

Teenage Helper: A Role in Community Mental Health G. A. ROGENESS M.D. 1 , and R. A. BEDNAR 2 1 Child Psychiatrist, Katharine Wright Psychiatric Clinic, 923 West Wellington Ave., Chicago, Ill. 60657 and Instructor, Department of Psychiatry, Abraham Lincoln School of Medicine, University of Illinois Medical center, and Child Fellow, Institute for Juvenile Research, Chicago 2 Psychologist, Katharine Wright Psychiatric Clinic, 923 West Wellington Ave., Chicago, Ill. 60657 To test the effect of being tutors on black, inner-city teenagers, the authors used high school students to tutor fourth- and fifth-grade children who had demonstrated behavior and personality problems in school. Tutoring took place in two schools and a mental health center. The tutors were evaluated on the basis of an interview, a sentence completion test, a questionnaire, and math and reading achievement tests before and after their involvement in the project. While many tutors showed improved achievement scores and most showed changed attitudes toward others, self, education, and the future, the degree of improvement appeared to depend on the structure of the tutoring program. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Psychiatry American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc (Journal)

Teenage Helper: A Role in Community Mental Health

American Journal of Psychiatry, Volume 130 (8): 933 – Aug 1, 1973
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Teenage Helper: A Role in Community Mental Health

Abstract

G. A. ROGENESS M.D. 1 , and R. A. BEDNAR 2 1 Child Psychiatrist, Katharine Wright Psychiatric Clinic, 923 West Wellington Ave., Chicago, Ill. 60657 and Instructor, Department of Psychiatry, Abraham Lincoln School of Medicine, University of Illinois Medical center, and Child Fellow, Institute for Juvenile Research, Chicago 2 Psychologist, Katharine Wright Psychiatric Clinic, 923 West Wellington Ave., Chicago, Ill. 60657 To test the effect of being tutors on black, inner-city teenagers, the authors used high school students to tutor fourth- and fifth-grade children who had demonstrated behavior and personality problems in school. Tutoring took place in two schools and a mental health center. The tutors were evaluated on the basis of an interview, a sentence completion test, a questionnaire, and math and reading achievement tests before and after their involvement in the project. While many tutors showed improved achievement scores and most showed changed attitudes toward others, self, education, and the future, the degree of improvement appeared to depend on the structure of the tutoring program.
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Publisher
American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc (Journal)
Copyright
Copyright © 1973 American Psychiatric Association. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0002-953X
D.O.I.
10.1176/appi.ajp.130.8.933
Publisher site
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Abstract

G. A. ROGENESS M.D. 1 , and R. A. BEDNAR 2 1 Child Psychiatrist, Katharine Wright Psychiatric Clinic, 923 West Wellington Ave., Chicago, Ill. 60657 and Instructor, Department of Psychiatry, Abraham Lincoln School of Medicine, University of Illinois Medical center, and Child Fellow, Institute for Juvenile Research, Chicago 2 Psychologist, Katharine Wright Psychiatric Clinic, 923 West Wellington Ave., Chicago, Ill. 60657 To test the effect of being tutors on black, inner-city teenagers, the authors used high school students to tutor fourth- and fifth-grade children who had demonstrated behavior and personality problems in school. Tutoring took place in two schools and a mental health center. The tutors were evaluated on the basis of an interview, a sentence completion test, a questionnaire, and math and reading achievement tests before and after their involvement in the project. While many tutors showed improved achievement scores and most showed changed attitudes toward others, self, education, and the future, the degree of improvement appeared to depend on the structure of the tutoring program.

Journal

American Journal of PsychiatryAmerican Psychiatric Publishing, Inc (Journal)

Published: Aug 1, 1973

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