The Dynamics of Capillary Flow

The Dynamics of Capillary Flow Penetration of Liquids into Cylindrical Capillaries.—The rate of penetration into a small capillary of radius r is shown to be: dl dt = P ( r 2 + 4 ε r ) 8 η l , where P is the driving pressure, ε the coefficient of slip and η the viscosity. By integrating this expression, the distance penetrated by a liquid flowing under capillary pressure alone into a horizontal capillary or one with small internal surface is found to be the square root of ( γ rt · cos θ 2 η ), where γ is the surface tension and θ the angle of contact. The quantity ( γ cos θ 2 η ) is called the coefficient of penetrance or the penetrativity of the liquid. Penetration of Liquids into a Porous Body .—(1) Theory . If a porous body behaves as an assemblage of very small cylindrical capillaries, the volume which penetrates in a time t would be proportional to the square root of ( γ t η ). (2) Experiments with mercury, water and other liquids completely verify the theoretical deductions. Dynamic capillary method of measuring surface tension is described. It possesses certain advantages on the static method of capillary rise. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Review American Physical Society (APS)

The Dynamics of Capillary Flow

Physical Review, Volume 17 (3) – Mar 1, 1921
Preview Only
11 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-physical-society-aps/the-dynamics-of-capillary-flow-xI6gR0JFn1
Publisher
American Physical Society (APS)
Copyright
© American Physical Society
D.O.I.
10.1103/PhysRev.17.273
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Penetration of Liquids into Cylindrical Capillaries.—The rate of penetration into a small capillary of radius r is shown to be: dl dt = P ( r 2 + 4 ε r ) 8 η l , where P is the driving pressure, ε the coefficient of slip and η the viscosity. By integrating this expression, the distance penetrated by a liquid flowing under capillary pressure alone into a horizontal capillary or one with small internal surface is found to be the square root of ( γ rt · cos θ 2 η ), where γ is the surface tension and θ the angle of contact. The quantity ( γ cos θ 2 η ) is called the coefficient of penetrance or the penetrativity of the liquid. Penetration of Liquids into a Porous Body .—(1) Theory . If a porous body behaves as an assemblage of very small cylindrical capillaries, the volume which penetrates in a time t would be proportional to the square root of ( γ t η ). (2) Experiments with mercury, water and other liquids completely verify the theoretical deductions. Dynamic capillary method of measuring surface tension is described. It possesses certain advantages on the static method of capillary rise.

Journal

Physical ReviewAmerican Physical Society (APS)

Published: Mar 1, 1921

There are no references for this article.

Sorry, we don’t have permission to share this article on DeepDyve,
but here are related articles that you can start reading right now:

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off