Cloud-Chamber Observations of Primary Cosmic-Ray Electrons

Cloud-Chamber Observations of Primary Cosmic-Ray Electrons for the deflection of the solar-produced particles into the polar regions. The double-hump structure of the increase in the intensity of the nucleonic component has not been observed previously. The most remarkable feature is the difference in the ratio, AI(McMurdo)/ AI(Thule), in the first hump as compared with the second. For an isotropic distribution of cosmic- ray intensity, the ratio is approximately unity. Hence, a value of the ratio exceeding unity is indicative of an anisotropy in the intensity dis- tribution of the solar-produced cosmic rays in the vicinity of the earth. As is seen in Fig. 1, the anisotropy prevailed during the first hump and isotropy has been almost established near the beginning of the second hump. A possible interpretation may be that, during the first hump, the earth was located near the boundary of the modulating region, which later completely sur- rounded the earth. It is interesting to note that the anistropy was evident only during the exceptionally long dura- tion (about 6 hours) of the Ha flare. However, the significance of this coincidence is not clear, especially since a Forbush-type decrease com- menced3 at approximately the same time as the termination of the optical flare. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Review Letters American Physical Society (APS)

Cloud-Chamber Observations of Primary Cosmic-Ray Electrons

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Publisher
American Physical Society (APS)
Copyright
Copyright © 1961 The American Physical Society
ISSN
1079-7114
D.O.I.
10.1103/PhysRevLett.6.125
Publisher site
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Abstract

for the deflection of the solar-produced particles into the polar regions. The double-hump structure of the increase in the intensity of the nucleonic component has not been observed previously. The most remarkable feature is the difference in the ratio, AI(McMurdo)/ AI(Thule), in the first hump as compared with the second. For an isotropic distribution of cosmic- ray intensity, the ratio is approximately unity. Hence, a value of the ratio exceeding unity is indicative of an anisotropy in the intensity dis- tribution of the solar-produced cosmic rays in the vicinity of the earth. As is seen in Fig. 1, the anisotropy prevailed during the first hump and isotropy has been almost established near the beginning of the second hump. A possible interpretation may be that, during the first hump, the earth was located near the boundary of the modulating region, which later completely sur- rounded the earth. It is interesting to note that the anistropy was evident only during the exceptionally long dura- tion (about 6 hours) of the Ha flare. However, the significance of this coincidence is not clear, especially since a Forbush-type decrease com- menced3 at approximately the same time as the termination of the optical flare.

Journal

Physical Review LettersAmerican Physical Society (APS)

Published: Feb 1, 1961

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