A Positively Charged Component of Cosmic Rays

A Positively Charged Component of Cosmic Rays where R and M are the radius and magnetic moment of the earth and k 2= 300 M/ V. On the basis of the theory of Lemaitre and Vallarta this implies the existence of an azimuthal asymmetry in the intensity of the corpuscular component of the cosmic radiation in latitudes where the intensity is varying, and the sign of 0 in (1) is such that positive rays should enter more abundantly from the west. As has been stated by Lemaitre and Vallarta, on the basis of the intensity measurements of Compton an azimuthal asymmetry should be detectable in latitudes between the equator and 34° geomagnetic and on the basis of Compton's own analysis of his data the greatest E-W differences should appear in latitudes between 200 and 300. With this prediction in mind measurements have been carried out in a tent on the flat roof of the Hotel Geneve in Mexico City at an elevation above sea level of 2250 meters and in geomagnetic latitude 290N. Two independent sets of Geiger-Mueller counters were used, arranged as coincidence counting telescopes.5 A summary of the data obtained during the first two weeks is contained in Table I. Each run consisted http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Review American Physical Society (APS)

A Positively Charged Component of Cosmic Rays

Preview Only
2 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-physical-society-aps/a-positively-charged-component-of-cosmic-rays-wQFKIO7Ab0
Publisher
American Physical Society (APS)
Copyright
Copyright © 1933 The American Physical Society
ISSN
1536-6065
D.O.I.
10.1103/PhysRev.43.835
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

where R and M are the radius and magnetic moment of the earth and k 2= 300 M/ V. On the basis of the theory of Lemaitre and Vallarta this implies the existence of an azimuthal asymmetry in the intensity of the corpuscular component of the cosmic radiation in latitudes where the intensity is varying, and the sign of 0 in (1) is such that positive rays should enter more abundantly from the west. As has been stated by Lemaitre and Vallarta, on the basis of the intensity measurements of Compton an azimuthal asymmetry should be detectable in latitudes between the equator and 34° geomagnetic and on the basis of Compton's own analysis of his data the greatest E-W differences should appear in latitudes between 200 and 300. With this prediction in mind measurements have been carried out in a tent on the flat roof of the Hotel Geneve in Mexico City at an elevation above sea level of 2250 meters and in geomagnetic latitude 290N. Two independent sets of Geiger-Mueller counters were used, arranged as coincidence counting telescopes.5 A summary of the data obtained during the first two weeks is contained in Table I. Each run consisted

Journal

Physical ReviewAmerican Physical Society (APS)

Published: May 15, 1933

There are no references for this article.

Sorry, we don’t have permission to share this article on DeepDyve,
but here are related articles that you can start reading right now:

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off