Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Vertical Splitting of Vortices in Geophysical Dipoles

Vertical Splitting of Vortices in Geophysical Dipoles The processes involved in the vertical splitting of vortices in geophysical dipoles, rotating and stably stratified, are investigated using a three-dimensional numerical model under the f -plane and Boussinesq approximations. Vertical splitting in asymmetric dipoles is possible when the vortices have a similar amount of potential vorticity but significantly differ in vertical extent. One representative case of vertical splitting is analyzed, and it is found that prior to the splitting there is a shearing period characterized by vertical unalignment and loss of horizontal axisymmetrization. The splitting starts when the upper and lower parts of the deep vortex independently experience vertical alignment and horizontal axisymmetrization. Vertical splitting also involves vortex horizontal splitting in the intermediate layers, which might explain the vertical asymmetry found in some isolated subsurface vortices in the ocean interior. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Physical Oceanography American Meteorological Society

Vertical Splitting of Vortices in Geophysical Dipoles

Journal of Physical Oceanography , Volume 40 (9) – Dec 18, 2009

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-meteorological-society/vertical-splitting-of-vortices-in-geophysical-dipoles-4eB8WxsZ5u
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0485
DOI
10.1175/2010JPO4418.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The processes involved in the vertical splitting of vortices in geophysical dipoles, rotating and stably stratified, are investigated using a three-dimensional numerical model under the f -plane and Boussinesq approximations. Vertical splitting in asymmetric dipoles is possible when the vortices have a similar amount of potential vorticity but significantly differ in vertical extent. One representative case of vertical splitting is analyzed, and it is found that prior to the splitting there is a shearing period characterized by vertical unalignment and loss of horizontal axisymmetrization. The splitting starts when the upper and lower parts of the deep vortex independently experience vertical alignment and horizontal axisymmetrization. Vertical splitting also involves vortex horizontal splitting in the intermediate layers, which might explain the vertical asymmetry found in some isolated subsurface vortices in the ocean interior.

Journal

Journal of Physical OceanographyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Dec 18, 2009

References