Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

TORNADO CLOUDS

TORNADO CLOUDS in various parts of the world are not given by the Weather Bureau, nor as fa r as I know by any European government. They cannot be deduced fro m the records of the ordinary anemometer, and anemometers especially devised to give these data are expensive and not wholly reliable. The only information regarding the velocities of the wind in tornadoes are mere guesses. It was thought that a simple and inexpensive device which would give at least an approximate idea of them would be of value. I sent a description of such a plan to the editor of the Scientific Amer- ican of which he wrote an account, 1924, 288. It consists merely of a set of hollow metallic cylinders either of lead or iron, all of exactly the same size, but with walls of different thickness. Small cylinders could consist merely of tin boxes laden with different materials ranging in specific gravity from feathers to alternate layers of wood and lead. At present I am merely partly filling the boxes with bird shot. The cyl- inders are arranged on a base which will trip them if they are blown ove r by the wind, and are tied http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-meteorological-society/tornado-clouds-Ak6kEqto0Y
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
eISSN
1520-0477
DOI
10.1175/1520-0477-13.12.234
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

in various parts of the world are not given by the Weather Bureau, nor as fa r as I know by any European government. They cannot be deduced fro m the records of the ordinary anemometer, and anemometers especially devised to give these data are expensive and not wholly reliable. The only information regarding the velocities of the wind in tornadoes are mere guesses. It was thought that a simple and inexpensive device which would give at least an approximate idea of them would be of value. I sent a description of such a plan to the editor of the Scientific Amer- ican of which he wrote an account, 1924, 288. It consists merely of a set of hollow metallic cylinders either of lead or iron, all of exactly the same size, but with walls of different thickness. Small cylinders could consist merely of tin boxes laden with different materials ranging in specific gravity from feathers to alternate layers of wood and lead. At present I am merely partly filling the boxes with bird shot. The cyl- inders are arranged on a base which will trip them if they are blown ove r by the wind, and are tied

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Dec 1, 1932

There are no references for this article.