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The Effect of Variable Sea Surface Temperature on Forecasting Sea Fog and Sea Breezes: A Case Study

The Effect of Variable Sea Surface Temperature on Forecasting Sea Fog and Sea Breezes: A Case Study A preliminary study of the effect of sea surface temperature (SST) temporal and spatial variability on regional coastal weather forecasts is described. A high-resolution numerical weather forecast model from the Met Office is run for the U.K. region with hourly updates of SST data obtained from a shelf sea model. When compared with a control run in which SST is maintained with Operational Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Ice Analysis (OSTIA) data, it is found that there are significant differences in the coastal-region forecasts for sea breezes and fog formation. The control run underestimates surface temperature and the strength of the sea breeze when compared with the run with hourly SST updates. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology American Meteorological Society

The Effect of Variable Sea Surface Temperature on Forecasting Sea Fog and Sea Breezes: A Case Study

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1558-8424
eISSN
1558-8432
DOI
10.1175/JAMC-D-11-0253.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A preliminary study of the effect of sea surface temperature (SST) temporal and spatial variability on regional coastal weather forecasts is described. A high-resolution numerical weather forecast model from the Met Office is run for the U.K. region with hourly updates of SST data obtained from a shelf sea model. When compared with a control run in which SST is maintained with Operational Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Ice Analysis (OSTIA) data, it is found that there are significant differences in the coastal-region forecasts for sea breezes and fog formation. The control run underestimates surface temperature and the strength of the sea breeze when compared with the run with hourly SST updates.

Journal

Journal of Applied Meteorology and ClimatologyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Nov 24, 2011

References