Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

PREFACE

PREFACE Antarctica is one of the most remote and inhospitable parts of our planet. Yet marked signatures of climate variability/change are being seen ever more clearly, from the five decades of strong warming along the west side of the Antarctic Peninsula ( Vaughan et al. 2001 ) to the pronounced impact of El Niño–Southern Oscillation in the Ross Sea sector during the 1990s ( Bromwich et al. 2000 ). The Antarctic ozone hole has underscored the impact of human activity on the global atmosphere since its discovery in 1985 ( Farman et al. 1985 ). In addition to its scientific importance, tourist visits to Antarctica during the austral summer by ship and air continue to increase steadily. These developments call for much better weather forecasting for year-round operations. Recent efforts to enhance Antarctic weather forecasting particularly include the international First Regional Observing Study of the Troposphere (FROST) project that ran from 1993 to 1999 with the goal of determining how well operational analyses and forecasts were performing poleward of 50°S (see the special issue of Weather and Forecasting dedicated to the project: December 1999, vol. 14, no. 6). Over the Southern Ocean the global products considered, such as from http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Monthly Weather Review American Meteorological Society

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-meteorological-society/preface-n50PAaLaG9
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0493
DOI
10.1175/1520-0493(2003)131<0269:P>2.0.CO;2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Antarctica is one of the most remote and inhospitable parts of our planet. Yet marked signatures of climate variability/change are being seen ever more clearly, from the five decades of strong warming along the west side of the Antarctic Peninsula ( Vaughan et al. 2001 ) to the pronounced impact of El Niño–Southern Oscillation in the Ross Sea sector during the 1990s ( Bromwich et al. 2000 ). The Antarctic ozone hole has underscored the impact of human activity on the global atmosphere since its discovery in 1985 ( Farman et al. 1985 ). In addition to its scientific importance, tourist visits to Antarctica during the austral summer by ship and air continue to increase steadily. These developments call for much better weather forecasting for year-round operations. Recent efforts to enhance Antarctic weather forecasting particularly include the international First Regional Observing Study of the Troposphere (FROST) project that ran from 1993 to 1999 with the goal of determining how well operational analyses and forecasts were performing poleward of 50°S (see the special issue of Weather and Forecasting dedicated to the project: December 1999, vol. 14, no. 6). Over the Southern Ocean the global products considered, such as from

Journal

Monthly Weather ReviewAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Feb 1, 2003

There are no references for this article.