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NEW STATION IN THE NORTH

NEW STATION IN THE NORTH Observatory of Harvard University for the seven months, November, 1932, to May, 1933. Prof . C.-G. ROSSBY, in charge of the Meteorology Course, Mass. Inst, of Technology, sailed Dec. 1 fo r Europe, where he will spend six months in research, chiefly in Scandinavia. Mr. D. C. ARCHIBALD, M.SC., who has been in charge of the Winnipeg office of the Meteorological Service in Canada, has been transferred to the Central Office in Toronto. A complete meteorological station, telegraphing twice daily to the cen- tral offices, has been installed by the Meteorological Service of Canada at Moosonee, on James Bay. This is the location of the old Hudson Bay Company fort, Moose Factory. It makes a welcome addition to the net- work of stations in Northern Canada. TH E "MARION " EXPEDITIO N T O DAVI S STRAIT AND BAFFI N BA Y 1 This bulletin is one of three on the Marion's cruise to the ice regions. Coast Guard Bulletin No. 19, Part III, by Lieut. Comm. Edward IT. Smith, concerns itself with the oceanography and the ice. Part II treats especially of the oceanography of Baffin Bay and Davis Strait: the former was published in 1931, and the latter will appear at an early date. This, Part I, by Noble G. Ricketts and Parker D, Trask, contains the narrative of the cruise, a description of the soundings, and a discus- sion of the bottom samples obtained. It is divided into three chapters, the first, descriptive; the second, the bathymetry; the third, the sedi- ments. The cruise was undertaken as part of the work of the International Ice Patrol, which began after the sinking of the Titanic, and the meet- ing of the 1914 International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea. The Marion left New London on July 7, 1928, cruised north as far as Disco Island on the west coast of Greenland, making oceanographic stations, weather permitting, along the coasts of Labrador and Green- land, and down the middle of Davis Strait. On the west coast of Greenland, near Port Quervain, latitude nearly 70, the cold wind from off the ice cap was noticed. A remarkable foehn occurred in a fiord south of Aulalsivik Island, on the coast of Labrador, near Hudson Strait, during which gusts of considerable suddenness and strength caused the ship to heel well over. One of these struck with gale force, blew hard for a few minutes, and stopped as suddenly as it had begun, to be followed by others at irregular intervals throughout the night. "The dry warmth caused by the compression of the down- flowing air, pervaded the whole locality, causing the dry bulb to read 72° F. at 8 p. m., while at the same time the wet bulb read only 55° F. "Th e greatly disturbed local atmospheric conditions can be realized fro m the following observation. Despite the dry heat of the place, sev- eral times we saw large snowflakes falling. At first we did not believe 1 U. S. Treasury Dept., Coast Guard Bulletin No. 19, Part I, Washington, 1932. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

NEW STATION IN THE NORTH

Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society , Volume 13 (12): 1 – Dec 1, 1932

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
eISSN
1520-0477
DOI
10.1175/1520-0477-13.12.239a
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Observatory of Harvard University for the seven months, November, 1932, to May, 1933. Prof . C.-G. ROSSBY, in charge of the Meteorology Course, Mass. Inst, of Technology, sailed Dec. 1 fo r Europe, where he will spend six months in research, chiefly in Scandinavia. Mr. D. C. ARCHIBALD, M.SC., who has been in charge of the Winnipeg office of the Meteorological Service in Canada, has been transferred to the Central Office in Toronto. A complete meteorological station, telegraphing twice daily to the cen- tral offices, has been installed by the Meteorological Service of Canada at Moosonee, on James Bay. This is the location of the old Hudson Bay Company fort, Moose Factory. It makes a welcome addition to the net- work of stations in Northern Canada. TH E "MARION " EXPEDITIO N T O DAVI S STRAIT AND BAFFI N BA Y 1 This bulletin is one of three on the Marion's cruise to the ice regions. Coast Guard Bulletin No. 19, Part III, by Lieut. Comm. Edward IT. Smith, concerns itself with the oceanography and the ice. Part II treats especially of the oceanography of Baffin Bay and Davis Strait: the former was published in 1931, and the latter will appear at an early date. This, Part I, by Noble G. Ricketts and Parker D, Trask, contains the narrative of the cruise, a description of the soundings, and a discus- sion of the bottom samples obtained. It is divided into three chapters, the first, descriptive; the second, the bathymetry; the third, the sedi- ments. The cruise was undertaken as part of the work of the International Ice Patrol, which began after the sinking of the Titanic, and the meet- ing of the 1914 International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea. The Marion left New London on July 7, 1928, cruised north as far as Disco Island on the west coast of Greenland, making oceanographic stations, weather permitting, along the coasts of Labrador and Green- land, and down the middle of Davis Strait. On the west coast of Greenland, near Port Quervain, latitude nearly 70, the cold wind from off the ice cap was noticed. A remarkable foehn occurred in a fiord south of Aulalsivik Island, on the coast of Labrador, near Hudson Strait, during which gusts of considerable suddenness and strength caused the ship to heel well over. One of these struck with gale force, blew hard for a few minutes, and stopped as suddenly as it had begun, to be followed by others at irregular intervals throughout the night. "The dry warmth caused by the compression of the down- flowing air, pervaded the whole locality, causing the dry bulb to read 72° F. at 8 p. m., while at the same time the wet bulb read only 55° F. "Th e greatly disturbed local atmospheric conditions can be realized fro m the following observation. Despite the dry heat of the place, sev- eral times we saw large snowflakes falling. At first we did not believe 1 U. S. Treasury Dept., Coast Guard Bulletin No. 19, Part I, Washington, 1932.

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Dec 1, 1932

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