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Moored Observations of Precipitation Temperature **

Moored Observations of Precipitation Temperature ** Direct observations of precipitation temperature were made from a surface buoy deployed for four months in the western Pacific warm pool. The observed rain droplet temperatures are equal to the wet-bulb temperature to within the measured wet-bulb temperature uncertainty of ±±0.4°°C. The rain droplet temperatures are 4.8°°––5.8°°C cooler than the ocean surface temperature. The sensible heat flux associated with the rain is found to be a significant component for the net surface heat while it is raining, ranging from −−65.0 to −−204 W m −−2 (ocean cooling) and accounting for 15%%––60%% of the net heat flux for any single rain event. The rain heat flux is also important on longer timescales in the warm pool, where there is a close balance between surface heating and cooling and high precipitation rates. During the 4-month deployment period, the rain heat flux is 2.8 W m −−2 (ocean cooling) and 15%% of the net surface heat flux. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology American Meteorological Society

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0426
DOI
10.1175/1520-0426(1998)015<0979:MOOPT>2.0.CO;2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Direct observations of precipitation temperature were made from a surface buoy deployed for four months in the western Pacific warm pool. The observed rain droplet temperatures are equal to the wet-bulb temperature to within the measured wet-bulb temperature uncertainty of ±±0.4°°C. The rain droplet temperatures are 4.8°°––5.8°°C cooler than the ocean surface temperature. The sensible heat flux associated with the rain is found to be a significant component for the net surface heat while it is raining, ranging from −−65.0 to −−204 W m −−2 (ocean cooling) and accounting for 15%%––60%% of the net heat flux for any single rain event. The rain heat flux is also important on longer timescales in the warm pool, where there is a close balance between surface heating and cooling and high precipitation rates. During the 4-month deployment period, the rain heat flux is 2.8 W m −−2 (ocean cooling) and 15%% of the net surface heat flux.

Journal

Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic TechnologyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jun 5, 1996

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