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letters to the editor

letters to the editor Comments on "Wind Chill Errors" (33 - T) to give a heat loss. It neglects breathing and Comments on "Wind Chill Errors": Part I evaporation, not to mention clothing. Worse is the assumption of a constant skin temperature of 33°C Kessler (1993) reminded readers not only of some (not °F) and the difficulty of reconciling this assump- shortcomings in the U.S. wind chill index but of some tion with the oft-quoted remark, "exposed flesh freezes." ways in which it is abused in the media. Reporters, As Siple and Passel's experiments were based on the however, can use only the information with whic h they rate of freezing, use of the wind chill scale at dry bulbs are officially supplied. above 0°C is problematic. Th e Siple and Passel equa- Correspondence with C. Passel in 1972, who was tion also implies that any wind at temperatures above then a petroleum geologist in Abilene, Texas, elicited 33°C would have a warming effect, which would the opinion that the National Weather Service had render fans ineffective. applied wind chill in unintended ways, extrapolating in The AT model involves a walking human exposed more sense s tha n applyin g it t o http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

letters to the editor

Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society , Volume 76 (9): 13 – Sep 1, 1995

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
DOI
10.1175/1520-0477-76.9.1628
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Comments on "Wind Chill Errors" (33 - T) to give a heat loss. It neglects breathing and Comments on "Wind Chill Errors": Part I evaporation, not to mention clothing. Worse is the assumption of a constant skin temperature of 33°C Kessler (1993) reminded readers not only of some (not °F) and the difficulty of reconciling this assump- shortcomings in the U.S. wind chill index but of some tion with the oft-quoted remark, "exposed flesh freezes." ways in which it is abused in the media. Reporters, As Siple and Passel's experiments were based on the however, can use only the information with whic h they rate of freezing, use of the wind chill scale at dry bulbs are officially supplied. above 0°C is problematic. Th e Siple and Passel equa- Correspondence with C. Passel in 1972, who was tion also implies that any wind at temperatures above then a petroleum geologist in Abilene, Texas, elicited 33°C would have a warming effect, which would the opinion that the National Weather Service had render fans ineffective. applied wind chill in unintended ways, extrapolating in The AT model involves a walking human exposed more sense s tha n applyin g it t o

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Sep 1, 1995

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