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In Memoriam

In Memoriam about our members AMS's president, Warren Washington, has been nominated by the country's president, Bill Clinton, to serve on the National Science Board. If appointed, Washington, along with five other nominees, will serve a six-year term until 10 May 2000. The Senate is expected to approve the nominations sometime during the fall. As a member of the 24-person board, Washington will help to participate in the board's functions: to assist the president and Congress in formulating national policies for science, engineering, and education, and to establish policies for the National Science Foundation (NSF). The National Science Board approves NSF's budget submittals to the president and Congress, approves new programs and major awards, and oversees the general functioning of NSF. One-third of the board is appointed every two years to ensure continuity. Washington, the director of the Climate and Global Dynamics Division of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), was one of the first scientists to develop climate models to investigate the possibility of a greenhouse problem. He has taken an active role in educating the public about the global environment throughout his career. Washington is the founder of the Black Environmental Science Trust (BEST), which is a nonprofit, multidonor foundation working toward in- creasing the number of black environmental scientists. A native of Portland, Oregon, Washington received his B.S. in physics Warren Washington and his M.S. in meteorology from Oregon State University in 1958 and 1960. He earned his Ph.D. in meteorology from The Pennsylvania State University in 1964. He has served NCAR for 30 years in various capacities, including program scientist, project leader, senior scientist and head of the Climate Section of the Atmospheric Analysis and Prediction Division, and his current position. He was also an adjunct associate professor of meteorology and oceanography at the University of Michigan early in his career. In addition to being the current president of the Society, Washington has served on the AMS Council, the Board on Women and Minorities, and the Awards Committee, among others. He was elected a Fellow of the Society in 1980. He has also been active on numerous committees forthe American Association forthe Advancement of Science, of which he was elected a fellow in 1981. He is a member of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and has participated on many panels forthe NSF, NASA, and the National Academy of Sciences/ National Research Council. From 1986 to 1989 he served on the editorial board of Climate Dynamics. In 1988 the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry honored Washington by featuring him as one of 16 scientists in the "Black Achievers in Science" exhibit on display through 1996. • Jl/iemxydom y 3€oimm/ dleicyuarii Mi/t/? 3). J/wmf^n 1935-/994 1931-1994 1922-1994 1880 Vol. 75, No. 10, October 1994 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
DOI
10.1175/1520-0477-75.10.1880b
Publisher site
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Abstract

about our members AMS's president, Warren Washington, has been nominated by the country's president, Bill Clinton, to serve on the National Science Board. If appointed, Washington, along with five other nominees, will serve a six-year term until 10 May 2000. The Senate is expected to approve the nominations sometime during the fall. As a member of the 24-person board, Washington will help to participate in the board's functions: to assist the president and Congress in formulating national policies for science, engineering, and education, and to establish policies for the National Science Foundation (NSF). The National Science Board approves NSF's budget submittals to the president and Congress, approves new programs and major awards, and oversees the general functioning of NSF. One-third of the board is appointed every two years to ensure continuity. Washington, the director of the Climate and Global Dynamics Division of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), was one of the first scientists to develop climate models to investigate the possibility of a greenhouse problem. He has taken an active role in educating the public about the global environment throughout his career. Washington is the founder of the Black Environmental Science Trust (BEST), which is a nonprofit, multidonor foundation working toward in- creasing the number of black environmental scientists. A native of Portland, Oregon, Washington received his B.S. in physics Warren Washington and his M.S. in meteorology from Oregon State University in 1958 and 1960. He earned his Ph.D. in meteorology from The Pennsylvania State University in 1964. He has served NCAR for 30 years in various capacities, including program scientist, project leader, senior scientist and head of the Climate Section of the Atmospheric Analysis and Prediction Division, and his current position. He was also an adjunct associate professor of meteorology and oceanography at the University of Michigan early in his career. In addition to being the current president of the Society, Washington has served on the AMS Council, the Board on Women and Minorities, and the Awards Committee, among others. He was elected a Fellow of the Society in 1980. He has also been active on numerous committees forthe American Association forthe Advancement of Science, of which he was elected a fellow in 1981. He is a member of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and has participated on many panels forthe NSF, NASA, and the National Academy of Sciences/ National Research Council. From 1986 to 1989 he served on the editorial board of Climate Dynamics. In 1988 the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry honored Washington by featuring him as one of 16 scientists in the "Black Achievers in Science" exhibit on display through 1996. • Jl/iemxydom y 3€oimm/ dleicyuarii Mi/t/? 3). J/wmf^n 1935-/994 1931-1994 1922-1994 1880 Vol. 75, No. 10, October 1994

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Oct 1, 1994

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