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Effects of Rheology and Ice Thickness Distribution in a Dynamic––Thermodynamic Sea Ice Model

Effects of Rheology and Ice Thickness Distribution in a Dynamic––Thermodynamic Sea Ice Model Realistic treatment of sea ice processes in general circulation models is needed to simulate properly global climate and climate change scenarios. As new sea ice treatments become available, it is necessary to evaluate them in terms of their accuracy and computational time. Here, several dynamic ice models are compared using both a 2-category and 28-category ice thickness distribution. Simulations are conducted under normal wind forcing, as well as under increased and decreased wind speeds. It is found that the lack of a shear strength parameterization in the cavitating fluid rheology produces significantly different results in both ice thickness and ice velocity than those produced by an elliptical rheology. Furthermore, use of a 28-category ice thickness distribution amplifies differences in the responses of the various models. While the choice of dynamic model is governed by requirements of accuracy and implementation, it appears that, in terms of both parameterization of physical properties and computational time, the elliptical rheology is well-suited for inclusion in a GCM. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Physical Oceanography American Meteorological Society

Effects of Rheology and Ice Thickness Distribution in a Dynamic––Thermodynamic Sea Ice Model

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0485
DOI
10.1175/1520-0485(1999)029<2656:EORAIT>2.0.CO;2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Realistic treatment of sea ice processes in general circulation models is needed to simulate properly global climate and climate change scenarios. As new sea ice treatments become available, it is necessary to evaluate them in terms of their accuracy and computational time. Here, several dynamic ice models are compared using both a 2-category and 28-category ice thickness distribution. Simulations are conducted under normal wind forcing, as well as under increased and decreased wind speeds. It is found that the lack of a shear strength parameterization in the cavitating fluid rheology produces significantly different results in both ice thickness and ice velocity than those produced by an elliptical rheology. Furthermore, use of a 28-category ice thickness distribution amplifies differences in the responses of the various models. While the choice of dynamic model is governed by requirements of accuracy and implementation, it appears that, in terms of both parameterization of physical properties and computational time, the elliptical rheology is well-suited for inclusion in a GCM.

Journal

Journal of Physical OceanographyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Sep 12, 1997

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