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Echo Height Measurements with the WSR-88D: Use of Data from One Versus Two Radars

Echo Height Measurements with the WSR-88D: Use of Data from One Versus Two Radars The new Doppler radars of the National Weather Service (i.e., the WSR-88D radars) are operated continuously in a volume scanning mode (called Volume Coverage Pattern, VCP) with the elevation tilt angles fixed for several VCPs. Because of the fixed VCPs, the radar data can be used to determine the heights of precipitation echo features only to limits of accuracy that depend upon the elevation angles used in the VCP, the radar beamwidth, and the range of echoes. Data from adjacent WSR-88D radars, if used simultaneously, could reduce significantly the height uncertainties inherent in single radar measurements. This is illustrated for idealized situations and also for an event involving a long-lived, tornadic thunderstorm. The use of coordinated scan strategies and combined data analysis procedures for adjacent WSR-88D radars during significant thunderstorm events should be considered for operational applications. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Weather and Forecasting American Meteorological Society

Echo Height Measurements with the WSR-88D: Use of Data from One Versus Two Radars

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0434
DOI
10.1175/1520-0434(1999)014<0455:EHMWTW>2.0.CO;2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The new Doppler radars of the National Weather Service (i.e., the WSR-88D radars) are operated continuously in a volume scanning mode (called Volume Coverage Pattern, VCP) with the elevation tilt angles fixed for several VCPs. Because of the fixed VCPs, the radar data can be used to determine the heights of precipitation echo features only to limits of accuracy that depend upon the elevation angles used in the VCP, the radar beamwidth, and the range of echoes. Data from adjacent WSR-88D radars, if used simultaneously, could reduce significantly the height uncertainties inherent in single radar measurements. This is illustrated for idealized situations and also for an event involving a long-lived, tornadic thunderstorm. The use of coordinated scan strategies and combined data analysis procedures for adjacent WSR-88D radars during significant thunderstorm events should be considered for operational applications.

Journal

Weather and ForecastingAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: May 11, 1998

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