Development of a Coupled Land Surface and Groundwater Model

Development of a Coupled Land Surface and Groundwater Model Traditional land surface models (LSMs) used for numerical weather simulation, climate projection, and as inputs to water management decision support systems, do not treat the LSM lower boundary in a fully process-based fashion. LSMs have evolved from a leaky-bucket approximation to more sophisticated land surface water and energy budget models that typically have a specified bottom layer flux to depict the lowest model layer exchange with deeper aquifers. The LSM lower boundary is often assumed zero flux or the soil moisture content is set to a constant value; an approach that while mass conservative, ignores processes that can alter surface fluxes, runoff, and water quantity and quality. Conversely, groundwater models (GWMs) for saturated and unsaturated water flow, while addressing important features such as subsurface heterogeneity and three-dimensional flow, often have overly simplified upper boundary conditions that ignore soil heating, runoff, snow, and root-zone uptake. In the present study, a state-of-the-art LSM (Common Land Model) and a variably saturated GWM (ParFlow) have been coupled as a single-column model. A set of simulations based on synthetic data and data from the Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (PILPS), version 2(d), 18-yr dataset from Valdai, Russia, demonstrate the temporal dynamics of this coupled modeling system. The soil moisture and water table depth simulated by the coupled model agree well with the Valdai observations. Differences in prediction between the coupled and uncoupled models demonstrate the effect of a dynamic water table on simulated watershed flow. Comparison of the coupled model predictions with observations indicates certain cold processes such as frozen soil and freeze/thaw processes have an important impact on predicted water table depth. Comparisons of soil moisture, latent heat, sensible heat, temperature, runoff, and predicted groundwater depth between the uncoupled and coupled models demonstrate the need for improved groundwater representation in land surface schemes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Hydrometeorology American Meteorological Society

Development of a Coupled Land Surface and Groundwater Model

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-meteorological-society/development-of-a-coupled-land-surface-and-groundwater-model-QSAevcHjt5
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1525-7541
D.O.I.
10.1175/JHM422.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Traditional land surface models (LSMs) used for numerical weather simulation, climate projection, and as inputs to water management decision support systems, do not treat the LSM lower boundary in a fully process-based fashion. LSMs have evolved from a leaky-bucket approximation to more sophisticated land surface water and energy budget models that typically have a specified bottom layer flux to depict the lowest model layer exchange with deeper aquifers. The LSM lower boundary is often assumed zero flux or the soil moisture content is set to a constant value; an approach that while mass conservative, ignores processes that can alter surface fluxes, runoff, and water quantity and quality. Conversely, groundwater models (GWMs) for saturated and unsaturated water flow, while addressing important features such as subsurface heterogeneity and three-dimensional flow, often have overly simplified upper boundary conditions that ignore soil heating, runoff, snow, and root-zone uptake. In the present study, a state-of-the-art LSM (Common Land Model) and a variably saturated GWM (ParFlow) have been coupled as a single-column model. A set of simulations based on synthetic data and data from the Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (PILPS), version 2(d), 18-yr dataset from Valdai, Russia, demonstrate the temporal dynamics of this coupled modeling system. The soil moisture and water table depth simulated by the coupled model agree well with the Valdai observations. Differences in prediction between the coupled and uncoupled models demonstrate the effect of a dynamic water table on simulated watershed flow. Comparison of the coupled model predictions with observations indicates certain cold processes such as frozen soil and freeze/thaw processes have an important impact on predicted water table depth. Comparisons of soil moisture, latent heat, sensible heat, temperature, runoff, and predicted groundwater depth between the uncoupled and coupled models demonstrate the need for improved groundwater representation in land surface schemes.

Journal

Journal of HydrometeorologyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: May 5, 2004

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off