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Comments on “A Quantitative Assessment of the NESDIS Auto-Estimator”

Comments on “A Quantitative Assessment of the NESDIS Auto-Estimator” The National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) Satellite Analysis Branch (SAB) computes operational quantitative precipitation estimates ( Borneman 1988 ) and provides real-time satellite precipitation estimates (SPEs) and outlooks to field forecasters. This information is transmitted to the field via satellite precipitation estimate messages called SPENES. These SPENES alert forecasters and hydrologists of the potential for heavy precipitation and flash floods over their watch and warning areas. For over 20 years, SPEs have been a manual/interactive process using the interactive flash flood analyzer (IFFA) technique ( Scofield and Oliver 1977 ; Scofield 1987 ). IFFA was designed for high-intensity precipitation events. However, due to the manual/interactive nature of the IFFA methodology, precipitation estimates cover limited areas for limited periods of time and can take a significant amount of time to produce. In order to improve the spatial and temporal coverage of SPEs while improving timeliness, NESDIS/Office of Research and Application (ORA) developed an automatic algorithm for high-intensity precipitation called the Auto-Estimator (A-E). The A-E was designed for cold-topped (less than −60°C) mesoscale convective systems ( Vicente et al. 1998 ). In addition, the original A-E was based on 10.7- μ m rain rate information at 30-min http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Weather and Forecasting American Meteorological Society

Comments on “A Quantitative Assessment of the NESDIS Auto-Estimator”

Weather and Forecasting , Volume 16 (2) – Sep 5, 2000

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0434
DOI
10.1175/1520-0434(2001)016<0277:COAQAO>2.0.CO;2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) Satellite Analysis Branch (SAB) computes operational quantitative precipitation estimates ( Borneman 1988 ) and provides real-time satellite precipitation estimates (SPEs) and outlooks to field forecasters. This information is transmitted to the field via satellite precipitation estimate messages called SPENES. These SPENES alert forecasters and hydrologists of the potential for heavy precipitation and flash floods over their watch and warning areas. For over 20 years, SPEs have been a manual/interactive process using the interactive flash flood analyzer (IFFA) technique ( Scofield and Oliver 1977 ; Scofield 1987 ). IFFA was designed for high-intensity precipitation events. However, due to the manual/interactive nature of the IFFA methodology, precipitation estimates cover limited areas for limited periods of time and can take a significant amount of time to produce. In order to improve the spatial and temporal coverage of SPEs while improving timeliness, NESDIS/Office of Research and Application (ORA) developed an automatic algorithm for high-intensity precipitation called the Auto-Estimator (A-E). The A-E was designed for cold-topped (less than −60°C) mesoscale convective systems ( Vicente et al. 1998 ). In addition, the original A-E was based on 10.7- μ m rain rate information at 30-min

Journal

Weather and ForecastingAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Sep 5, 2000

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