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COMMENTS AND REPLY

COMMENTS AND REPLY COMMENT S method to data from 967 radiosonde stations and re- Comments on 'Trends in port a globally averaged increase in cloud-top height of about 154 m decade-1, a decrease in cloud-base Low and High Cloud height of about 44 m decade-1, a 1.7% decade-1 in- Boundaries and Errors in crease in the frequency of clouds, and an unquantified increase in the frequency of multilayer clouds. Height Determination of Given the implications of these findings for inter- preting other changes in climate, it is important to Cloud Boundaries" determine whether they are robust. Changes in in- struments and observing practices are manifest in —DIA N J. SEIDEL time series of radiosonde temperature (Gaffen 1994; NOAA Air Resources Laboratory, Parker and Cox 1995) and humidity (Elliott and Silver Spring, Maryland Gaffen 1991) records and, if not accounted for, can severely undermine attempts to estimate temperature —IMK E DURRE trends (Gaffen et al. 2000). Since the CE method in- NOAA National Climatic Data Center, fers cloud layers from temperature and humidity Asheville, North Carolina profiles, it is reasonable to question whether tempo- ral data inhomogeneities also impact radiosonde- derived cloud trends. hernykh et al. (2001, hereafter CAE) report trends in cloud-base http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
DOI
10.1175/BAMS-84-2-237
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

COMMENT S method to data from 967 radiosonde stations and re- Comments on 'Trends in port a globally averaged increase in cloud-top height of about 154 m decade-1, a decrease in cloud-base Low and High Cloud height of about 44 m decade-1, a 1.7% decade-1 in- Boundaries and Errors in crease in the frequency of clouds, and an unquantified increase in the frequency of multilayer clouds. Height Determination of Given the implications of these findings for inter- preting other changes in climate, it is important to Cloud Boundaries" determine whether they are robust. Changes in in- struments and observing practices are manifest in —DIA N J. SEIDEL time series of radiosonde temperature (Gaffen 1994; NOAA Air Resources Laboratory, Parker and Cox 1995) and humidity (Elliott and Silver Spring, Maryland Gaffen 1991) records and, if not accounted for, can severely undermine attempts to estimate temperature —IMK E DURRE trends (Gaffen et al. 2000). Since the CE method in- NOAA National Climatic Data Center, fers cloud layers from temperature and humidity Asheville, North Carolina profiles, it is reasonable to question whether tempo- ral data inhomogeneities also impact radiosonde- derived cloud trends. hernykh et al. (2001, hereafter CAE) report trends in cloud-base

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Feb 1, 2003

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