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An Isotropic Light Sensor for Measurements of Visible Actinic Flux in Clouds

An Isotropic Light Sensor for Measurements of Visible Actinic Flux in Clouds A low-cost isotropic light sensor is described consisting of a spherical diffuser connected to a single photodiode by a light conductor. The directional response to light is isotropic to a high degree. The small, lightweight, and rugged construction makes this instrument suitable not only for application on aircraft or under balloons but also on the ground in microclimatological studies. A vertical profile of actinic flux in the visible range (400––750 nm) in Arctic stratus, obtained with this instrument under a tethered balloon during the FIRE experiment in 1998, is presented. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology American Meteorological Society

An Isotropic Light Sensor for Measurements of Visible Actinic Flux in Clouds

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0426
DOI
10.1175/1520-0426(1999)016<1698:AILSFM>2.0.CO;2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A low-cost isotropic light sensor is described consisting of a spherical diffuser connected to a single photodiode by a light conductor. The directional response to light is isotropic to a high degree. The small, lightweight, and rugged construction makes this instrument suitable not only for application on aircraft or under balloons but also on the ground in microclimatological studies. A vertical profile of actinic flux in the visible range (400––750 nm) in Arctic stratus, obtained with this instrument under a tethered balloon during the FIRE experiment in 1998, is presented.

Journal

Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic TechnologyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jul 15, 1998

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