75 YEARS AGO

75 YEARS AGO evening was "Happenings at the NCEP, Three Years Fujita was world-renowned for his research into after Its Formation." Hoke explained the responsibili- microbursts and clockwise rotating tornadoes. ties of NCEP's branches and how they help their cus- Telfeyan commented that the weather community has tomers. He also discussed the intricacy of the NCEP lost a true pioneer with the passing away of Fujita. computers and how they are similar in function to the —John Zanfardino. Air Force Weather Agency's functions. Telfeyan then presented Hoke with the book Nebraskaland Weather Chicago and expressed sincere thanks to Hoke for his time and The 5 January 1999 meeting was held at Lewis expertise. University's Harold E. White Aviation Center. Chap- A possible speaker for the January meeting was then ter President Alan Sealls presided and introduced Dave discussed. Telfeyan also brought to the chapter's at- Kleckner, United Airlines meteorologist, who spoke tention the passing of Theodore Fujita, the individual about activities related to his attendance at the 79th responsible for developing the "F" index for tornadoes. AMS Annual Meeting. Program Chairman Ray The Value of Meteorology in Science Teaching in Secondary Education Science in Secondary Education is considered primarily for its preparatory value. It broadens the horizon and enables the student to meet and understand problems of a scientific nature in the battle of life. Evidently meteorology is valuable in many ways to accomplish the above pur- pose. Meteorology found in its broad expression, in the work of the United States Weather Bureau, gives us practical application of many of the principles of pure science. At Woodward High School, the birthplace of the Cincinnati Weather Observatory, the student is made conversant with the important work done by Mr. W. C. Devereaux, Meteorolo- gist. A study of the weather map is made the background of observed phenomena and their meaning. By visiting the Weather Bureau they then get a better idea of its importance, through lectures from Meteorologist Devereaux. They then make their own observations and record them in graphical form. The instruction is based on the problem-project method. A few of these may illustrate its value. "Why do some people suffer from nasal hemorrhage on ascending Pike's Peak?" This is made a project of several problems for laboratory. 1. What is the effect on the pulse rate and its tonicity on running up a flight of stairs? 2. What is the difference in barometric readings on the top floor of school as compared with the readings in the schoolyard? 3. Why does air pressure vary with altitude? 4. Has air weight? 5. Does the heart lose its tonicity on ascending heights? These are solved by the students using proper apparatus. [ . . . ] Dr. W. J. Humphreys said that a thing to be guarded against in the experimental type of meteorological instruction is the student's gaining an idea that weather processes are simple. These experiments, readily performed, while excellent demonstrations of certain phenomena should not be allowed to give the student the impression that processes of nature are as simple as these elementary laboratory experiments. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc5,42-43. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 50 1 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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American Meteorological Society
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Copyright © American Meteorological Society
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1520-0477
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10.1175/1520-0477-80.3.501
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Abstract

evening was "Happenings at the NCEP, Three Years Fujita was world-renowned for his research into after Its Formation." Hoke explained the responsibili- microbursts and clockwise rotating tornadoes. ties of NCEP's branches and how they help their cus- Telfeyan commented that the weather community has tomers. He also discussed the intricacy of the NCEP lost a true pioneer with the passing away of Fujita. computers and how they are similar in function to the —John Zanfardino. Air Force Weather Agency's functions. Telfeyan then presented Hoke with the book Nebraskaland Weather Chicago and expressed sincere thanks to Hoke for his time and The 5 January 1999 meeting was held at Lewis expertise. University's Harold E. White Aviation Center. Chap- A possible speaker for the January meeting was then ter President Alan Sealls presided and introduced Dave discussed. Telfeyan also brought to the chapter's at- Kleckner, United Airlines meteorologist, who spoke tention the passing of Theodore Fujita, the individual about activities related to his attendance at the 79th responsible for developing the "F" index for tornadoes. AMS Annual Meeting. Program Chairman Ray The Value of Meteorology in Science Teaching in Secondary Education Science in Secondary Education is considered primarily for its preparatory value. It broadens the horizon and enables the student to meet and understand problems of a scientific nature in the battle of life. Evidently meteorology is valuable in many ways to accomplish the above pur- pose. Meteorology found in its broad expression, in the work of the United States Weather Bureau, gives us practical application of many of the principles of pure science. At Woodward High School, the birthplace of the Cincinnati Weather Observatory, the student is made conversant with the important work done by Mr. W. C. Devereaux, Meteorolo- gist. A study of the weather map is made the background of observed phenomena and their meaning. By visiting the Weather Bureau they then get a better idea of its importance, through lectures from Meteorologist Devereaux. They then make their own observations and record them in graphical form. The instruction is based on the problem-project method. A few of these may illustrate its value. "Why do some people suffer from nasal hemorrhage on ascending Pike's Peak?" This is made a project of several problems for laboratory. 1. What is the effect on the pulse rate and its tonicity on running up a flight of stairs? 2. What is the difference in barometric readings on the top floor of school as compared with the readings in the schoolyard? 3. Why does air pressure vary with altitude? 4. Has air weight? 5. Does the heart lose its tonicity on ascending heights? These are solved by the students using proper apparatus. [ . . . ] Dr. W. J. Humphreys said that a thing to be guarded against in the experimental type of meteorological instruction is the student's gaining an idea that weather processes are simple. These experiments, readily performed, while excellent demonstrations of certain phenomena should not be allowed to give the student the impression that processes of nature are as simple as these elementary laboratory experiments. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc5,42-43. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 50 1

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Mar 1, 1999

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