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25 years ago

25 years ago Pryzbylinski announced that Ernie Goetsch is leaving In addition to all these challenges, Weaving said the St. Louis NWS office to become the meteorologist that the Operation Desert Storm air war kicked off on in charge at the Lincoln, Illinois, office. 17 January 1991 in the "worst weather in 14 years" in The guest speaker for the evening was Col. William the Persian Gulf. Climatology predicted low clouds Weaving. As staff weather officer for the Third Army would be present 18% of the time. However, low when Operation Desert Shield began, it wa s Weaving's clouds existed 39% of the time, causing aircrews to job to set up and provide weather support to the U.S. miss 40% of the primary targets in the first 10 days of Army for the campaign. According to Weaving, after the air war. In spite of all this, the Air Weather Service two months, the 1690th Weather Group (Provisional) weather forecast for the start of the air war was on was formed, with Weaving as the vice commander. target. Weaving said that he also simultaneously served as Weaving said that three Air Weather Service per- the deputy director of weather for General Norman sonnel lost their lives; about 145 weather troops were Schwarzkopf. among the forces who invaded Iraq and Kuwait during Weaving explained that the Air Weather Service the ground war; and, at the liberation ceremony for the experienced many challenges during the Gulf War. returning American ambassador to Kuwait, four out of Among the biggest challenges were transporting, seven of the people who raised the U.S. flag over the housing, feeding, and providing sanitary conditions for America n embassy were weather persons. a group of people equivalent in number to the popula- —Lauraleen O'Connor. tion of Oklahoma City. Challenges to weather support included setting up a communicatio n network compat- Santa Barbara-Ventura ible among all the military units; receipt and dissemi- The first meeting of the season was held on 19 nation of weather satellite imagery; powder-fine dust October with officer elections for the 1994/95 heading that got into every piece of equipment and made chapter business. Alan Fox, chapter copresident, visibility observations extremely difficult; and provid- introduced the idea to have one member give a 15- ing weathe r support to weapo n systems not previously minute synopsis of an article from any AMS journal at supported; surface temperatures so hot that some each meeting. equipment had to be buried in the ground for protec- This meeting also started off the precipitation con- tion; performing normal observing, forecasting, and test in which chapter members participate each year. briefing duties wearing chemical protective gear. —Alan Fox. National University Forecast Competition The universities' National Forecast Contest went into its third year this fall with four teams entered in the Quarter Forecasting League (QFL) and seven teams in the Semester Forecasting 2 5 League (SFL). The schools in the QFL are Florida State University, Oregon State University, Pennsylvania State University, and University of Utah. In the SFL are City College of New York, New York University, Saint Louis University, San Jose State College, University of Oklahoma, University of Texas, and Lakeland (Fla.) High School. This year the contestants are again forecasting maximum temperature and rainfall. The forecast points are Bismark, N. Dak., Indianapolis, Ind., and Charleston, W. Va., for the first period; Albuquerque, N. Mex., and Jackson, Miss., for the second period; and Caribou, Me., for the playoff between the winning teams of each league. The number of forecasting days and the forecast sites are not identical for each league. Therefore, a playoff, designated the "World Showers," will be run to pick the national champion among the schools. The tea m standings for last year were as follows (low score wins). Quarter Forecasting League: University of Utah—2941; Florida State University—2962; Oregon State University—3077; Pennsylvania State University—3529. Semester Forecasting League: St. Louis University— 2098; San Jose State College—2295; University of Oklahoma—2603; University of Texas— ago 2883; New York University—2949. St. Louis University beat University of Utah in the playoff to become national champion for the year. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 50,898. Vol. 75, No. 11, November 1994 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
DOI
10.1175/1520-0477-75.11.2202
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Abstract

Pryzbylinski announced that Ernie Goetsch is leaving In addition to all these challenges, Weaving said the St. Louis NWS office to become the meteorologist that the Operation Desert Storm air war kicked off on in charge at the Lincoln, Illinois, office. 17 January 1991 in the "worst weather in 14 years" in The guest speaker for the evening was Col. William the Persian Gulf. Climatology predicted low clouds Weaving. As staff weather officer for the Third Army would be present 18% of the time. However, low when Operation Desert Shield began, it wa s Weaving's clouds existed 39% of the time, causing aircrews to job to set up and provide weather support to the U.S. miss 40% of the primary targets in the first 10 days of Army for the campaign. According to Weaving, after the air war. In spite of all this, the Air Weather Service two months, the 1690th Weather Group (Provisional) weather forecast for the start of the air war was on was formed, with Weaving as the vice commander. target. Weaving said that he also simultaneously served as Weaving said that three Air Weather Service per- the deputy director of weather for General Norman sonnel lost their lives; about 145 weather troops were Schwarzkopf. among the forces who invaded Iraq and Kuwait during Weaving explained that the Air Weather Service the ground war; and, at the liberation ceremony for the experienced many challenges during the Gulf War. returning American ambassador to Kuwait, four out of Among the biggest challenges were transporting, seven of the people who raised the U.S. flag over the housing, feeding, and providing sanitary conditions for America n embassy were weather persons. a group of people equivalent in number to the popula- —Lauraleen O'Connor. tion of Oklahoma City. Challenges to weather support included setting up a communicatio n network compat- Santa Barbara-Ventura ible among all the military units; receipt and dissemi- The first meeting of the season was held on 19 nation of weather satellite imagery; powder-fine dust October with officer elections for the 1994/95 heading that got into every piece of equipment and made chapter business. Alan Fox, chapter copresident, visibility observations extremely difficult; and provid- introduced the idea to have one member give a 15- ing weathe r support to weapo n systems not previously minute synopsis of an article from any AMS journal at supported; surface temperatures so hot that some each meeting. equipment had to be buried in the ground for protec- This meeting also started off the precipitation con- tion; performing normal observing, forecasting, and test in which chapter members participate each year. briefing duties wearing chemical protective gear. —Alan Fox. National University Forecast Competition The universities' National Forecast Contest went into its third year this fall with four teams entered in the Quarter Forecasting League (QFL) and seven teams in the Semester Forecasting 2 5 League (SFL). The schools in the QFL are Florida State University, Oregon State University, Pennsylvania State University, and University of Utah. In the SFL are City College of New York, New York University, Saint Louis University, San Jose State College, University of Oklahoma, University of Texas, and Lakeland (Fla.) High School. This year the contestants are again forecasting maximum temperature and rainfall. The forecast points are Bismark, N. Dak., Indianapolis, Ind., and Charleston, W. Va., for the first period; Albuquerque, N. Mex., and Jackson, Miss., for the second period; and Caribou, Me., for the playoff between the winning teams of each league. The number of forecasting days and the forecast sites are not identical for each league. Therefore, a playoff, designated the "World Showers," will be run to pick the national champion among the schools. The tea m standings for last year were as follows (low score wins). Quarter Forecasting League: University of Utah—2941; Florida State University—2962; Oregon State University—3077; Pennsylvania State University—3529. Semester Forecasting League: St. Louis University— 2098; San Jose State College—2295; University of Oklahoma—2603; University of Texas— ago 2883; New York University—2949. St. Louis University beat University of Utah in the playoff to become national champion for the year. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 50,898. Vol. 75, No. 11, November 1994

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Nov 1, 1994

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