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25 years ago . . .

25 years ago . . . at AMS headquarters and 20th at headquarters for extended discussions with On 6 February 1986, the Society welcomed visitors from Spengler, and AMS Counsel Robert E. McLaughlin. Shanghai: Zhu Young Ti, secretary-general of the Shanghai On the 20th, Zhu Yong-Ti and Liao Bo-Zhen stopped by Meteorological Society, chief of the Office of Computer Development and Application, Shanghai Typhoon Institute; headquarters again with Mr. Xu Wu-Tong, also of the and Liao Bo-Zhen, engineer at the Telecommunication Shanghai Meteorological Bureau, to meet President Station of the Shanghai Meteorological Bureau. Smagorinsky. On 21 February, Jack Borden of "For Spacious Skies," We were saddened by the death of AMS Secretary-Treasurer David F. Landrigan on 7 February. came to the Society to show Spengler and Mazur a tape concerning the educational program being planned for Several of the staff attended his funeral services on the 10th. elementary- and secondary-school teachers in the St. Louis Ted Miles and Mara Janelli of Expanded Video were at area under the guidance of Ronald A. Yarons of St. Louis. John H. Conover was at AMS on the 24th to make headquarters on the 11th to discuss with Executive Director Kenneth C. Spengler and his assistant, Evelyn some final changes in his manuscript concerning the history Mazur, possible production of a public-service of the Blue Hill Observatory, currently under consideration for publication by the Society. announcement concerning the AMS Seal of Approval program. Spengler went to Washington, D.C., on the 25th for a On 11 and 12 February, Mickey Glantz of NCAR; meeting with Fred D. White, outgoing chairman, and Donald L. Gilman of NOAA/NWS; William C. Burrows of Maynard E. Smith, incoming chairman, of the EPA/AMS Deere and Company; Werner A. Baum, headquarters Steering Committee under our cooperative agreement with consultant; and Robert E. McLaughlin, AMS Counsel, met the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. While in with Spengler to consider in detail the possibility of AMS Washington, Spengler attended a luncheon honoring Grover participation in a proposed magazine on climate impact. Donald Hughes of the International Section of NOAA/NWS for over 43 years of government service and over 30 years The Admissions Committee met on 18 February. Present were Chairman Owen R. Cote, U.S. Air Force of work on WMO matters. Spengler also went to the Geophysics Laboratory; John E. Wallace, Weather Services National Science Foundation for discussions with various Corporation; John W. Wilson, Stone and Webster staff members in the Atmospheric Sciences Division and a Engineering Corporation; and Keith L. Seitter, University brief discussion with AMS past-president Eugene W. Bierly. of Lowell. Joining the Committee at lunch were AMS On 25 February, Paul F. Twitchell of NAVAIR, a President Joseph Smagorinsky, who spent the 18th, 19th, former AMS councilor, visited headquarters. • 25 years ago.. . THUHDEHSTQHM MORPHOLOGY AND DYNAMICS New York Weather Bureau Office Second Edition, Revised and Enlarged Has Left the Battery* Edited by Edwin Kessler After fifty years at the Battery and ninety years in lower Manhat- Volume 2 of Thunderstorms: tan, at the year's end the New York Weather Bureau Office moved A Social, Scientific, and uptown to Rockefeller Center. Technological Documentary A new weather radar requiring the tallest flat-topped building in This fascinating study presents the current state of knowledge the city was the principal reason for the move. The RCA Building about the form and worldwide distribution of thunderstorms and their associated physical processes-thermal, dynamical, answered the requirement, and once the instrument was installed hygrological, and electrical. "It comprises 16 contributions from 25 authors, which, merge into a coherent picture of thunderstorm the Weather Bureau Office had to follow. The scanner of the pow- climatology, structure, and associated physical processes. Most erful new radar, capable of sweeping the sky to a distance of 250 to chapters are well-documented statements of the current state of knowledge appropriate for classroom use. ..I intend to use it ex- 300 miles, was expected to be in operation early in February. tensively for my own course in cumulus dynamics and recom- mend it to others." The new official temperature readings are now made in a stand- — Thomas A Schroeder, Bulletin of the AMS. ard instrument shelter in Central Park. Comparisons for record ex- 432 pp , 300 illus.. maps, charts, graphs, drawings, tables, refs, index, 81/ X11 $68.50 tremes of heat, cold, rain and snow fall are now based on the data Also by Edwin Kessler of weather observations taken in Central Park since 28 December THE THUNDERSTORM IN HUMAN AFFAIRS 1868, two years before the first Federal station was set up in lower Second Edition, Revised and Enlarged 200 pp., 100 color/b&w illus., maps, charts, Manhattan under the Signal Corps. Ernest J. Christie, meteorolo- ; drawings, tables, 8V x11. $24.95 gist in charge of the 32-man New York office at the time of the Please write for our free catalog. From your bookseller, move, said that the Bureau had received many complaints about or order direct (add $1.50 post/hand) . the temperature readings made on the roof of 17 Battery Place, 454 ft high. Charles Knudsen, supervising forecaster, was insisting on hourly street observations made from Rockefeller Plaza, and also hoped to have a raingage somewhere in the Plaza to check on University of the Central Park readings. • , Oklahoma Press v \ Dept. 912 - 1005 Asp Ave Norman, OK. 73019 *Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 42, 238. Bulletin American Meteorological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

25 years ago . . .

Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society , Volume 67 (4): 1 – Apr 1, 1986

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
DOI
10.1175/1520-0477-67.4.471b
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Abstract

at AMS headquarters and 20th at headquarters for extended discussions with On 6 February 1986, the Society welcomed visitors from Spengler, and AMS Counsel Robert E. McLaughlin. Shanghai: Zhu Young Ti, secretary-general of the Shanghai On the 20th, Zhu Yong-Ti and Liao Bo-Zhen stopped by Meteorological Society, chief of the Office of Computer Development and Application, Shanghai Typhoon Institute; headquarters again with Mr. Xu Wu-Tong, also of the and Liao Bo-Zhen, engineer at the Telecommunication Shanghai Meteorological Bureau, to meet President Station of the Shanghai Meteorological Bureau. Smagorinsky. On 21 February, Jack Borden of "For Spacious Skies," We were saddened by the death of AMS Secretary-Treasurer David F. Landrigan on 7 February. came to the Society to show Spengler and Mazur a tape concerning the educational program being planned for Several of the staff attended his funeral services on the 10th. elementary- and secondary-school teachers in the St. Louis Ted Miles and Mara Janelli of Expanded Video were at area under the guidance of Ronald A. Yarons of St. Louis. John H. Conover was at AMS on the 24th to make headquarters on the 11th to discuss with Executive Director Kenneth C. Spengler and his assistant, Evelyn some final changes in his manuscript concerning the history Mazur, possible production of a public-service of the Blue Hill Observatory, currently under consideration for publication by the Society. announcement concerning the AMS Seal of Approval program. Spengler went to Washington, D.C., on the 25th for a On 11 and 12 February, Mickey Glantz of NCAR; meeting with Fred D. White, outgoing chairman, and Donald L. Gilman of NOAA/NWS; William C. Burrows of Maynard E. Smith, incoming chairman, of the EPA/AMS Deere and Company; Werner A. Baum, headquarters Steering Committee under our cooperative agreement with consultant; and Robert E. McLaughlin, AMS Counsel, met the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. While in with Spengler to consider in detail the possibility of AMS Washington, Spengler attended a luncheon honoring Grover participation in a proposed magazine on climate impact. Donald Hughes of the International Section of NOAA/NWS for over 43 years of government service and over 30 years The Admissions Committee met on 18 February. Present were Chairman Owen R. Cote, U.S. Air Force of work on WMO matters. Spengler also went to the Geophysics Laboratory; John E. Wallace, Weather Services National Science Foundation for discussions with various Corporation; John W. Wilson, Stone and Webster staff members in the Atmospheric Sciences Division and a Engineering Corporation; and Keith L. Seitter, University brief discussion with AMS past-president Eugene W. Bierly. of Lowell. Joining the Committee at lunch were AMS On 25 February, Paul F. Twitchell of NAVAIR, a President Joseph Smagorinsky, who spent the 18th, 19th, former AMS councilor, visited headquarters. • 25 years ago.. . THUHDEHSTQHM MORPHOLOGY AND DYNAMICS New York Weather Bureau Office Second Edition, Revised and Enlarged Has Left the Battery* Edited by Edwin Kessler After fifty years at the Battery and ninety years in lower Manhat- Volume 2 of Thunderstorms: tan, at the year's end the New York Weather Bureau Office moved A Social, Scientific, and uptown to Rockefeller Center. Technological Documentary A new weather radar requiring the tallest flat-topped building in This fascinating study presents the current state of knowledge the city was the principal reason for the move. The RCA Building about the form and worldwide distribution of thunderstorms and their associated physical processes-thermal, dynamical, answered the requirement, and once the instrument was installed hygrological, and electrical. "It comprises 16 contributions from 25 authors, which, merge into a coherent picture of thunderstorm the Weather Bureau Office had to follow. The scanner of the pow- climatology, structure, and associated physical processes. Most erful new radar, capable of sweeping the sky to a distance of 250 to chapters are well-documented statements of the current state of knowledge appropriate for classroom use. ..I intend to use it ex- 300 miles, was expected to be in operation early in February. tensively for my own course in cumulus dynamics and recom- mend it to others." The new official temperature readings are now made in a stand- — Thomas A Schroeder, Bulletin of the AMS. ard instrument shelter in Central Park. Comparisons for record ex- 432 pp , 300 illus.. maps, charts, graphs, drawings, tables, refs, index, 81/ X11 $68.50 tremes of heat, cold, rain and snow fall are now based on the data Also by Edwin Kessler of weather observations taken in Central Park since 28 December THE THUNDERSTORM IN HUMAN AFFAIRS 1868, two years before the first Federal station was set up in lower Second Edition, Revised and Enlarged 200 pp., 100 color/b&w illus., maps, charts, Manhattan under the Signal Corps. Ernest J. Christie, meteorolo- ; drawings, tables, 8V x11. $24.95 gist in charge of the 32-man New York office at the time of the Please write for our free catalog. From your bookseller, move, said that the Bureau had received many complaints about or order direct (add $1.50 post/hand) . the temperature readings made on the roof of 17 Battery Place, 454 ft high. Charles Knudsen, supervising forecaster, was insisting on hourly street observations made from Rockefeller Plaza, and also hoped to have a raingage somewhere in the Plaza to check on University of the Central Park readings. • , Oklahoma Press v \ Dept. 912 - 1005 Asp Ave Norman, OK. 73019 *Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 42, 238. Bulletin American Meteorological Society

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Apr 1, 1986

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