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25 YEARS AGO

25 YEARS AGO On 23 January 1997, performing other meteorological duties, including Elliot Abrams, senior acting as the weather liaison to a Strategic Air Com- vice president and chief mand unit based there. Following his military obliga- forecaste r at Accu- tion, Ostby was employed with Trans World Airlines Weather , of State Col- (TWA) as a meteorologist at LaGuardia Field in New lege, Pennsylvania, was York. A year later he joined the Northeast Weather presente d with the Service in Lexington, Massachusetts, a small up-and- 1997 National Weather coming private weather service founded by John Association' s (NWA) Wallace. Ostby subsequently returned to TWA and Radio-TV Broadcaster of was stationed in Kansas City, where he prepared up- the Year award. per-air wind forecasts that were to be used to mini- A s chief forecaster, mize enroute times for cross-country flights. Abrams leads forecaster In 1956 Ostby joined a newly established forecast- operation s at Accu- Elliot Abrams ing venture in his home state of Connecticut, in Hart- Weather, helping to en- ford, known as the Travelers Weather Service. For the sure the accuracy of forecasts. next several years he was primarily involved in per- In addition to the NWA award, Abrams was hon- forming television and radio weathercasting. He and his colleagues were among the first group to receive ored with AMS' s Award for Outstanding Service by the AMS Seals of Approval for Television and Radio a Broadcast Meteorologist in 1993 "for decades of in 1960. It was at Travelers that Ostby became inter- significant contributions to radio weather broadcast- ing and to weather education at all levels" and the ested in applied research and obtained his M.S. from Charles L. Mitchell Award in 1994 "for outstanding NYU while continuing full-time involvement in fore- and unique dissemination of weather forecasts to the casting and research. In 1970 he joined the NWS as a nation's public by radio and television." He is one of two people who have earned AMS accreditation as a Certified Consulting Meteorologist and the AMS Seals of Approval for both radio and television. Spac e Shuttl e Progra m fo r th e Futur e After 30 years of service, Frederick P. Ostby re- A space shuttle program tired from the NWS on 3 January 1997. At the time with the objective of getting of his retirement, Ostby was the director of the Na- both men and equipment to tional Severe Storms Forecast Center (NSSFC) in and from space routinely at a Kansas City, Missouri, where he directed a team of fraction of today's cost has meteorologists in its national programs of forecasting been approved by President severe local storms and aviation-related weather haz- Nixon. The decision to proceed with plans for ards. During his tenure, he oversaw the implementa- the space shuttle as developed by the aerospace tion of much new technology that increased produc- industry and the National Aeronautics and tivity resulting in more timely and accurate tornado Space Administration will change the nature and severe thunderstorm watches. This contributed to of man's place in space. The airplane-like or- a significant decrease in the annual death toll from biter of the space shuttle, which will be about tornadoes across the country. the size of a DC-9 with a delta-wing, will be Ostby is a native of Connecticut, where several capabl e of carrying useful payloads up to brushes with hurricanes and nor'easters at an early age 15 f t in diameter by 60 ft in length, weighing heightened his interest in meteorology. He received up to 65 000 lb. There will be hatches on top his B.S. and M.S. in meteorology at New York Uni- of the compartment of the orbiter to facilitate unloading and deployment of large spacecraft versity (NYU). At the time of finishing his under- in space. graduate work he also received a commission in the U.S. Air Force. When the Korean conflict erupted, he was called to active duty and spent two years as a Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 53, 293. weather officer at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. His responsibilities included briefing pilots and Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 4 523 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
DOI
10.1175/1520-0477-78.3.523
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Abstract

On 23 January 1997, performing other meteorological duties, including Elliot Abrams, senior acting as the weather liaison to a Strategic Air Com- vice president and chief mand unit based there. Following his military obliga- forecaste r at Accu- tion, Ostby was employed with Trans World Airlines Weather , of State Col- (TWA) as a meteorologist at LaGuardia Field in New lege, Pennsylvania, was York. A year later he joined the Northeast Weather presente d with the Service in Lexington, Massachusetts, a small up-and- 1997 National Weather coming private weather service founded by John Association' s (NWA) Wallace. Ostby subsequently returned to TWA and Radio-TV Broadcaster of was stationed in Kansas City, where he prepared up- the Year award. per-air wind forecasts that were to be used to mini- A s chief forecaster, mize enroute times for cross-country flights. Abrams leads forecaster In 1956 Ostby joined a newly established forecast- operation s at Accu- Elliot Abrams ing venture in his home state of Connecticut, in Hart- Weather, helping to en- ford, known as the Travelers Weather Service. For the sure the accuracy of forecasts. next several years he was primarily involved in per- In addition to the NWA award, Abrams was hon- forming television and radio weathercasting. He and his colleagues were among the first group to receive ored with AMS' s Award for Outstanding Service by the AMS Seals of Approval for Television and Radio a Broadcast Meteorologist in 1993 "for decades of in 1960. It was at Travelers that Ostby became inter- significant contributions to radio weather broadcast- ing and to weather education at all levels" and the ested in applied research and obtained his M.S. from Charles L. Mitchell Award in 1994 "for outstanding NYU while continuing full-time involvement in fore- and unique dissemination of weather forecasts to the casting and research. In 1970 he joined the NWS as a nation's public by radio and television." He is one of two people who have earned AMS accreditation as a Certified Consulting Meteorologist and the AMS Seals of Approval for both radio and television. Spac e Shuttl e Progra m fo r th e Futur e After 30 years of service, Frederick P. Ostby re- A space shuttle program tired from the NWS on 3 January 1997. At the time with the objective of getting of his retirement, Ostby was the director of the Na- both men and equipment to tional Severe Storms Forecast Center (NSSFC) in and from space routinely at a Kansas City, Missouri, where he directed a team of fraction of today's cost has meteorologists in its national programs of forecasting been approved by President severe local storms and aviation-related weather haz- Nixon. The decision to proceed with plans for ards. During his tenure, he oversaw the implementa- the space shuttle as developed by the aerospace tion of much new technology that increased produc- industry and the National Aeronautics and tivity resulting in more timely and accurate tornado Space Administration will change the nature and severe thunderstorm watches. This contributed to of man's place in space. The airplane-like or- a significant decrease in the annual death toll from biter of the space shuttle, which will be about tornadoes across the country. the size of a DC-9 with a delta-wing, will be Ostby is a native of Connecticut, where several capabl e of carrying useful payloads up to brushes with hurricanes and nor'easters at an early age 15 f t in diameter by 60 ft in length, weighing heightened his interest in meteorology. He received up to 65 000 lb. There will be hatches on top his B.S. and M.S. in meteorology at New York Uni- of the compartment of the orbiter to facilitate unloading and deployment of large spacecraft versity (NYU). At the time of finishing his under- in space. graduate work he also received a commission in the U.S. Air Force. When the Korean conflict erupted, he was called to active duty and spent two years as a Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 53, 293. weather officer at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. His responsibilities included briefing pilots and Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 4 523

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Mar 1, 1997

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