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Zinc Absorption From Human Milk: Need for Zinc Supplementation-Reply

Zinc Absorption From Human Milk: Need for Zinc Supplementation-Reply Abstract In Reply.—We read with interest the letter by Drs Gupta and Gupta. We agree that zinc nutrition of the neonate should still be of concern and that zinc requirements may need to be reevaluated; however, we take issue with some of the statements provided. That two single cases of zinc deficiency in infants have been reported is surely not sufficient evidence to contradict the statement that zinc deficiency is rare in breast-fed infants. Although we are aware of two additional cases,1,2 all four of these infants were born prematurely. It is well known that premature infants will have lower stores of trace elements such as zinc, copper, and iron3 and consequently have higher requirements than full-term infants. We agree that pooled mature breast milk may provide inadequate amounts of zinc to compensate for this increased demand. There are several reasons why it is often recommended that the References 1. Blom I, Jameson S, Krook F, et al: Zinc deficiency with transitory acrodermatitis enteropathica in a boy of low birth weight . Br J Dermatol 1980;104:459-464.Crossref 2. Zimmerman AW, Hambidge M, Lepov ML, et al: Acrodermatitis in breast-fed premature infants: Evidence for a defect in mammary zinc secretion . Pediatrics 1982;69:176-183. 3. Widdowson EM: Trace elements in foetal and early postnatal development . Proc Nutr Soc 1974;33:275-284.Crossref 4. Mendelson RA, Anderson GH, Bryan MH: Zinc, copper and iron content of milk from mothers of preterm and full-term infants . Early Hum Dev 1982;6:145-151.Crossref 5. Lönnerdal B, Keen CL: Trace element absorption in infants: Potentials and limitations , in Clarkson TW (ed): Reproductive and Developmental Toxicity of Metals . New York, Plenum Press, 1983, pp 759-776. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

Zinc Absorption From Human Milk: Need for Zinc Supplementation-Reply

Zinc Absorption From Human Milk: Need for Zinc Supplementation-Reply

Abstract

Abstract In Reply.—We read with interest the letter by Drs Gupta and Gupta. We agree that zinc nutrition of the neonate should still be of concern and that zinc requirements may need to be reevaluated; however, we take issue with some of the statements provided. That two single cases of zinc deficiency in infants have been reported is surely not sufficient evidence to contradict the statement that zinc deficiency is rare in breast-fed infants. Although we are aware of two additional...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1984 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1984.02140480091031
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In Reply.—We read with interest the letter by Drs Gupta and Gupta. We agree that zinc nutrition of the neonate should still be of concern and that zinc requirements may need to be reevaluated; however, we take issue with some of the statements provided. That two single cases of zinc deficiency in infants have been reported is surely not sufficient evidence to contradict the statement that zinc deficiency is rare in breast-fed infants. Although we are aware of two additional cases,1,2 all four of these infants were born prematurely. It is well known that premature infants will have lower stores of trace elements such as zinc, copper, and iron3 and consequently have higher requirements than full-term infants. We agree that pooled mature breast milk may provide inadequate amounts of zinc to compensate for this increased demand. There are several reasons why it is often recommended that the References 1. Blom I, Jameson S, Krook F, et al: Zinc deficiency with transitory acrodermatitis enteropathica in a boy of low birth weight . Br J Dermatol 1980;104:459-464.Crossref 2. Zimmerman AW, Hambidge M, Lepov ML, et al: Acrodermatitis in breast-fed premature infants: Evidence for a defect in mammary zinc secretion . Pediatrics 1982;69:176-183. 3. Widdowson EM: Trace elements in foetal and early postnatal development . Proc Nutr Soc 1974;33:275-284.Crossref 4. Mendelson RA, Anderson GH, Bryan MH: Zinc, copper and iron content of milk from mothers of preterm and full-term infants . Early Hum Dev 1982;6:145-151.Crossref 5. Lönnerdal B, Keen CL: Trace element absorption in infants: Potentials and limitations , in Clarkson TW (ed): Reproductive and Developmental Toxicity of Metals . New York, Plenum Press, 1983, pp 759-776.

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1984

References

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