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Your Baby and Child.

Your Baby and Child. In this book Overton has developed a rather unique plan to inform the mother of such facts as he thinks it necessary for her to know. There are no chapters, but he has selected one hundred and thirty-five subjects for discussion. He does not use the silly question and answer method of presentation but gives a lucid brief exposition of essential topics varying from breast feeding (covered in six pages) to cradle cap (discussed in a quarter of a page). The subjects are especially well chosen, and the book is well written. Overton has made no effort to impress the mother with his unbounded wisdom on all matters but keeps to his subjects in a logical way. Debatable points are stated as such, and no dogmatic rules are laid down to the detriment of other schools of thought. This is especially true in the discussion of feeding and the vitamins. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1936 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1936.04140030254019
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this book Overton has developed a rather unique plan to inform the mother of such facts as he thinks it necessary for her to know. There are no chapters, but he has selected one hundred and thirty-five subjects for discussion. He does not use the silly question and answer method of presentation but gives a lucid brief exposition of essential topics varying from breast feeding (covered in six pages) to cradle cap (discussed in a quarter of a page). The subjects are especially well chosen, and the book is well written. Overton has made no effort to impress the mother with his unbounded wisdom on all matters but keeps to his subjects in a logical way. Debatable points are stated as such, and no dogmatic rules are laid down to the detriment of other schools of thought. This is especially true in the discussion of feeding and the vitamins.

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1936

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