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Young-Onset Dementia—New Insights for an Underappreciated Problem

Young-Onset Dementia—New Insights for an Underappreciated Problem Editorial Opinion David S. Knopman, MD At one time in the not-too-distant past, young-onset demen- used to find cases within health care systems that provide com- tia (YOD) was considered a disease, whereas later-onset de- plete coverage of a defined geographic region. Both the qual- mentia (LOD) was considered the inevitable consequence of ity of the medical record diagnostic coding system and the ex- aging. We now reject such a tent to which a health care system can claim virtually complete formulation, but within that coverage of the population within a geographic area limit the Related article page 1080 misguided dichotomy is a rec- opportunities to perform epidemiological investigations of ognition of the dramatic dif- dementia. If those criteria are met, using medical record evi- ferences in prevalence and incidence of YOD compared with dence to enumerate cases can be justified, because persons with YOD should all eventually have contact with their local LOD. In this issue of JAMA Neurology, Hendriks et al quanti- tate dementia prevalence in persons aged 30 to 64 years or regional clinicians. An advantage of using the results of rou- through a meta-analysis of 74 individual studies. tine medical care to identify prevalent cases http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Neurology American Medical Association

Young-Onset Dementia—New Insights for an Underappreciated Problem

JAMA Neurology , Volume 78 (9) – Sep 19, 2021

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2021 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2168-6149
eISSN
2168-6157
DOI
10.1001/jamaneurol.2021.1760
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Editorial Opinion David S. Knopman, MD At one time in the not-too-distant past, young-onset demen- used to find cases within health care systems that provide com- tia (YOD) was considered a disease, whereas later-onset de- plete coverage of a defined geographic region. Both the qual- mentia (LOD) was considered the inevitable consequence of ity of the medical record diagnostic coding system and the ex- aging. We now reject such a tent to which a health care system can claim virtually complete formulation, but within that coverage of the population within a geographic area limit the Related article page 1080 misguided dichotomy is a rec- opportunities to perform epidemiological investigations of ognition of the dramatic dif- dementia. If those criteria are met, using medical record evi- ferences in prevalence and incidence of YOD compared with dence to enumerate cases can be justified, because persons with YOD should all eventually have contact with their local LOD. In this issue of JAMA Neurology, Hendriks et al quanti- tate dementia prevalence in persons aged 30 to 64 years or regional clinicians. An advantage of using the results of rou- through a meta-analysis of 74 individual studies. tine medical care to identify prevalent cases

Journal

JAMA NeurologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 19, 2021

References