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Yeast in Tuberculosis—A Claim to Priority.

Yeast in Tuberculosis—A Claim to Priority. Buffalo, N. Y., July 3, 1905. To the Editor: —In a recent article by Huggard and Marland, in the Lancet, June 3, 1905, the action of yeast in tuberculosis and its influence on the opsonic index, they state that they have made observations on the influence, if any, of yeast, taken internally, on tuberculosis. They selected cases, chronic in nature, in which the patient had either "stuck in the mud" or was losing ground. A number of cases which were going downhill were also included in the observation. The results in some cases were striking, in others encouraging, in others almost nil. "In most cases the downward course either became less rapid or was arrested, and the stationary cases improved, etc." A good account of the article appeared in abstract in The Journal July 1, 1905, p. 75. In reading the original article I was struck with the absence of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Yeast in Tuberculosis—A Claim to Priority.

JAMA , Volume XLV (3) – Jul 15, 1905

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1905 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1905.02510030065018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Buffalo, N. Y., July 3, 1905. To the Editor: —In a recent article by Huggard and Marland, in the Lancet, June 3, 1905, the action of yeast in tuberculosis and its influence on the opsonic index, they state that they have made observations on the influence, if any, of yeast, taken internally, on tuberculosis. They selected cases, chronic in nature, in which the patient had either "stuck in the mud" or was losing ground. A number of cases which were going downhill were also included in the observation. The results in some cases were striking, in others encouraging, in others almost nil. "In most cases the downward course either became less rapid or was arrested, and the stationary cases improved, etc." A good account of the article appeared in abstract in The Journal July 1, 1905, p. 75. In reading the original article I was struck with the absence of

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 15, 1905

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