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X-Ray Exposure in Dermatology Personnel

X-Ray Exposure in Dermatology Personnel Abstract Since May, 1951, the members of the University of Michigan Department of Dermatology have worn lapel photographic film badge dosimeters as part of an extensive monitoring program covering all University personnel who are in contact with radioactive materials and other sources of radiation. This report covers exposures to members of only the Department of Dermatology. Radium therapy or other means of radiation therapy, with the exception of x-ray itself, is not employed by members of the Department. The x-ray machines which were the source of these exposures were operated in the energy range of 94 to 100 kv. Measurement of x-ray dosage by photographic means depends on the establishment of a one-to-one relationship between the x-ray dose and photographic effect. Since a roentgen is the measure of radiation energy absorbed in air, and the photographic effect is the result of ionization of the silver halide in the photographic References 1. References 1 to 6. 2. Tochilin, E.: Personal communication to the authors. 3. References 9 and 10. 4. Radiation Detection Company, P.O. Box 155, Station A, Palo Alto, Calif. 5. Radiological Monitoring Methods of Instruments, Handbook 51, United States National Bureau of Standards, 1952. 6. Photographic Dosimetry of X- and Gamma Rays, Handbook 57, United States Department of Commerce, National Bureau of Standards, 1954. 7. Tochilin, E.: Davis, R. H., and Clifford, L. J.: A Calibrated Roentgen-Ray Film Badge Dosimeter , Am. J. Roentgenol. 64:475, 1950. 8. Wilsey, R. B.: The Use of Photographic Films for Monitoring Stray X-Rays and Gamma Rays , Radiology 56:229, 1951. 9. Hine, G. J.: The Range of Usefulness of Photographic Film in Roentgen Dosimetry , Am. J. Roentgenol. 72:2, 1954. 10. Ehrlich, M., and Fitch, S.: Photographic X- and Gamma Ray Dosimetry , Nucleonics 9:5, 1951. 11. Medical X-Ray Protection up to Two Million Volts, Handbook 41, United States Department of Commerce, National Bureau of Standards, 1949. 12. International Commission on Radiological Protection , Brit. J. Radiol. 27:316; 245, 1954. 13. DeAmicis, E.; Spalding, C. K., and Cowing, R. F.: Radiation Exposure Survey of X-ray and Isotope Personnel , Nucleonics 5:63, 1949. 14. DeAmicis, E.; Spalding, C. K., and Cowing, R. F.: Survey of X-ray Exposures in Hospital Personnel , J. A. M. A. 149:924, 1952.Crossref 15. Hunter, F. T., and Robbins, L. L.: The Protection of Personnel Engaged in Roentgenology and Radiology , New England J. Med. 244:9, 1951.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

X-Ray Exposure in Dermatology Personnel

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1956 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-5359
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1956.01550010068007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Since May, 1951, the members of the University of Michigan Department of Dermatology have worn lapel photographic film badge dosimeters as part of an extensive monitoring program covering all University personnel who are in contact with radioactive materials and other sources of radiation. This report covers exposures to members of only the Department of Dermatology. Radium therapy or other means of radiation therapy, with the exception of x-ray itself, is not employed by members of the Department. The x-ray machines which were the source of these exposures were operated in the energy range of 94 to 100 kv. Measurement of x-ray dosage by photographic means depends on the establishment of a one-to-one relationship between the x-ray dose and photographic effect. Since a roentgen is the measure of radiation energy absorbed in air, and the photographic effect is the result of ionization of the silver halide in the photographic References 1. References 1 to 6. 2. Tochilin, E.: Personal communication to the authors. 3. References 9 and 10. 4. Radiation Detection Company, P.O. Box 155, Station A, Palo Alto, Calif. 5. Radiological Monitoring Methods of Instruments, Handbook 51, United States National Bureau of Standards, 1952. 6. Photographic Dosimetry of X- and Gamma Rays, Handbook 57, United States Department of Commerce, National Bureau of Standards, 1954. 7. Tochilin, E.: Davis, R. H., and Clifford, L. J.: A Calibrated Roentgen-Ray Film Badge Dosimeter , Am. J. Roentgenol. 64:475, 1950. 8. Wilsey, R. B.: The Use of Photographic Films for Monitoring Stray X-Rays and Gamma Rays , Radiology 56:229, 1951. 9. Hine, G. J.: The Range of Usefulness of Photographic Film in Roentgen Dosimetry , Am. J. Roentgenol. 72:2, 1954. 10. Ehrlich, M., and Fitch, S.: Photographic X- and Gamma Ray Dosimetry , Nucleonics 9:5, 1951. 11. Medical X-Ray Protection up to Two Million Volts, Handbook 41, United States Department of Commerce, National Bureau of Standards, 1949. 12. International Commission on Radiological Protection , Brit. J. Radiol. 27:316; 245, 1954. 13. DeAmicis, E.; Spalding, C. K., and Cowing, R. F.: Radiation Exposure Survey of X-ray and Isotope Personnel , Nucleonics 5:63, 1949. 14. DeAmicis, E.; Spalding, C. K., and Cowing, R. F.: Survey of X-ray Exposures in Hospital Personnel , J. A. M. A. 149:924, 1952.Crossref 15. Hunter, F. T., and Robbins, L. L.: The Protection of Personnel Engaged in Roentgenology and Radiology , New England J. Med. 244:9, 1951.Crossref

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1956

References