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Worldwide Preparedness for Kidney Health Care

Worldwide Preparedness for Kidney Health Care Opinion EDITORIAL Sreedhar Mandayam, MD, MPH; Wolfgang C. Winkelmayer, MD, MPH, ScD The World Bank reports that the number of people living in adjusted life-years. Despite these concerning statistics, CKD absolute poverty (ie, consuming less than US $1.90 at 2011 pur- prevention and treatment have not been established among chasing power parity) has declined from 42% in 1981 to 10.7% the World Health Organization’s 25 by 2025 goals. in 2013, representing a sub- Although a great deal of information on kidney diseases is stantial improvement in liv- collected and available in some countries, mostly in North Related article page 1864 ing conditions across the America, Australia, and Western Europe, very little was previ- globe, driven largely by developments in China and India. As ously known about the state of kidney health care worldwide societies modernize and standards of living improve, an epi- that could provide a comprehensive snapshot toward inform- demiologic transition ensues, with noncommunicable dis- ing global, regional, or local health authorities about opportu- eases competing increasingly with communicable, maternal, nities to improve the kidney health of their populations. neonatal, and nutritional diseases as causes of morbidity and In this issue of JAMA, Bello et al present the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Worldwide Preparedness for Kidney Health Care

JAMA , Volume 317 (18) – May 9, 2017

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2017.2825
pmid
28430831
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Opinion EDITORIAL Sreedhar Mandayam, MD, MPH; Wolfgang C. Winkelmayer, MD, MPH, ScD The World Bank reports that the number of people living in adjusted life-years. Despite these concerning statistics, CKD absolute poverty (ie, consuming less than US $1.90 at 2011 pur- prevention and treatment have not been established among chasing power parity) has declined from 42% in 1981 to 10.7% the World Health Organization’s 25 by 2025 goals. in 2013, representing a sub- Although a great deal of information on kidney diseases is stantial improvement in liv- collected and available in some countries, mostly in North Related article page 1864 ing conditions across the America, Australia, and Western Europe, very little was previ- globe, driven largely by developments in China and India. As ously known about the state of kidney health care worldwide societies modernize and standards of living improve, an epi- that could provide a comprehensive snapshot toward inform- demiologic transition ensues, with noncommunicable dis- ing global, regional, or local health authorities about opportu- eases competing increasingly with communicable, maternal, nities to improve the kidney health of their populations. neonatal, and nutritional diseases as causes of morbidity and In this issue of JAMA, Bello et al present the

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 9, 2017

References