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Workforce and Lifestyle Issues in General Surgery Training and Practice

Workforce and Lifestyle Issues in General Surgery Training and Practice PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS Workforce and Lifestyle Issues in General Surgery Training and Practice J. David Richardson, MD or the past quarter century, I have had the opportunity to be involved in the training of 145 general surgery chief residents as a member of the surgical faculty at the University of Louisville. I have also been privileged to have served as a director of the American F Board of Surgery and to have been a member of the Residency Review Committee for Surgery. With these several perspectives, I will share some thoughts on the state of our general surgical workforce and the training of surgery residents and address what I view as challenges for the next generation in the provision of surgical care. It is my belief that our country has major general surgical workforce issues that are likely to reach a crisis level within the next decade and beyond. Clearly, this is a bold statement and one that is factually diffi- cult to prove. It is difficult to accurately assess how many surgeons are in active practice in the country; it is doubly diffi- cult to quantify how many surgeons are needed. The calculated proper number of surgeons needed per http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Surgery American Medical Association

Workforce and Lifestyle Issues in General Surgery Training and Practice

JAMA Surgery , Volume 137 (5) – May 1, 2002

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2002 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6254
eISSN
2168-6262
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.137.5.515
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS Workforce and Lifestyle Issues in General Surgery Training and Practice J. David Richardson, MD or the past quarter century, I have had the opportunity to be involved in the training of 145 general surgery chief residents as a member of the surgical faculty at the University of Louisville. I have also been privileged to have served as a director of the American F Board of Surgery and to have been a member of the Residency Review Committee for Surgery. With these several perspectives, I will share some thoughts on the state of our general surgical workforce and the training of surgery residents and address what I view as challenges for the next generation in the provision of surgical care. It is my belief that our country has major general surgical workforce issues that are likely to reach a crisis level within the next decade and beyond. Clearly, this is a bold statement and one that is factually diffi- cult to prove. It is difficult to accurately assess how many surgeons are in active practice in the country; it is doubly diffi- cult to quantify how many surgeons are needed. The calculated proper number of surgeons needed per

Journal

JAMA SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 2002

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