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Why the Ethics of Parsimonious Medicine Is Not the Ethics of Rationing

Why the Ethics of Parsimonious Medicine Is Not the Ethics of Rationing VIEWPOINT Why the Ethics of Parsimonious Medicine Is Not the Ethics of Rationing benefit, that guide allocation of truly scarce resources (eg, Jon C. Tilburt, MD organs). Thus, different types of rationing may be more or Christine K. Cassel, MD less ethically justified, depending on the underlying ethi- cal rationale. HE ETHICS OF RATIONING HEALTH CARE RESOURCES The ethical rationale for rationing appropriately rests on has been debated for decades. Opponents of a concern for distributive justice. Some have argued that rationing are concerned that societal interests basic health status is a prerequisite for equal opportunity Twill supplant respect for individual patient choice to participate in society and that health care is therefore a and professional judgment. Advocates argue that injus- basic social good or even a human right. To the extent that tices in the current system necessitate that physicians use health care helps citizens obtain health, health care should resources prudently on behalf of society, even in their be distributed fairly throughout society, especially where daily work with individual patients. The debate is impor- supported by public funding. Expenditures of health care tant, potentially divisive, and unavoidable. resources that are only modestly more effective but far more http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Why the Ethics of Parsimonious Medicine Is Not the Ethics of Rationing

JAMA , Volume 309 (8) – Feb 27, 2013

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2013 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2013.368
pmid
23443438
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

VIEWPOINT Why the Ethics of Parsimonious Medicine Is Not the Ethics of Rationing benefit, that guide allocation of truly scarce resources (eg, Jon C. Tilburt, MD organs). Thus, different types of rationing may be more or Christine K. Cassel, MD less ethically justified, depending on the underlying ethi- cal rationale. HE ETHICS OF RATIONING HEALTH CARE RESOURCES The ethical rationale for rationing appropriately rests on has been debated for decades. Opponents of a concern for distributive justice. Some have argued that rationing are concerned that societal interests basic health status is a prerequisite for equal opportunity Twill supplant respect for individual patient choice to participate in society and that health care is therefore a and professional judgment. Advocates argue that injus- basic social good or even a human right. To the extent that tices in the current system necessitate that physicians use health care helps citizens obtain health, health care should resources prudently on behalf of society, even in their be distributed fairly throughout society, especially where daily work with individual patients. The debate is impor- supported by public funding. Expenditures of health care tant, potentially divisive, and unavoidable. resources that are only modestly more effective but far more

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 27, 2013

References