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Whose Schizophrenia Is It, Anyway?

Whose Schizophrenia Is It, Anyway? Mr B. was admitted to the coronary care unit with advanced cardiomyopathy possibly due to alcoholism but with a history of treatment for schizophrenia. Carrying a psychiatric consultation slip marked "As soon as possible," I went expecting to encounter the usual case: a patient who was restless and confused with a debilitating disease that contributed to a low level of manageability. I saw a man who looked younger than his 40 years. His chest bare, he was soundly asleep, head back, arms strapped to the bed. "Why the restraints?" I ventured. The nurse replied, "When he is awake he's wild; the only thing that calms him down is intravenous morphine." "Why intravenous?" "He has prolonged prothrombin times and hematomas develop if we give it IM." The problem was no longer simple. Was this alcohol, medication, or drug withdrawal; an acute psychotic break; hepatic encephalopathy; or delirium due to one of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Whose Schizophrenia Is It, Anyway?

JAMA , Volume 251 (19) – May 18, 1984

Whose Schizophrenia Is It, Anyway?

Abstract


Mr B. was admitted to the coronary care unit with advanced cardiomyopathy possibly due to alcoholism but with a history of treatment for schizophrenia. Carrying a psychiatric consultation slip marked "As soon as possible," I went expecting to encounter the usual case: a patient who was restless and confused with a debilitating disease that contributed to a low level of manageability.
I saw a man who looked younger than his 40 years. His chest bare, he was soundly asleep, head back,...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1984 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1984.03340430018008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Mr B. was admitted to the coronary care unit with advanced cardiomyopathy possibly due to alcoholism but with a history of treatment for schizophrenia. Carrying a psychiatric consultation slip marked "As soon as possible," I went expecting to encounter the usual case: a patient who was restless and confused with a debilitating disease that contributed to a low level of manageability. I saw a man who looked younger than his 40 years. His chest bare, he was soundly asleep, head back, arms strapped to the bed. "Why the restraints?" I ventured. The nurse replied, "When he is awake he's wild; the only thing that calms him down is intravenous morphine." "Why intravenous?" "He has prolonged prothrombin times and hematomas develop if we give it IM." The problem was no longer simple. Was this alcohol, medication, or drug withdrawal; an acute psychotic break; hepatic encephalopathy; or delirium due to one of

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 18, 1984

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