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WHAT SHOULD THE CHILD WITH LEUKEMIA BE TOLD?

WHAT SHOULD THE CHILD WITH LEUKEMIA BE TOLD? This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract To the Editor: For a time the correspondence section of the major pediatric journals was unfortunately devoid of nonscientific controversy. A few years back the principal topic centered around the increasing dissatisfaction of a number of pediatricians with the practice of pediatrics. I trust these gentlemen have resolved their problem satisfactorily to allow the rest of us to continue. In the horizon there now looms the question of what should be told a child who has leukemia. Most of the advice is coming from "large" centers in the form of generalizations based on "controlled studies," "statistics," and the like. How can the subject of impending death, as it relates to a child, be anything but a personal and intimate matter? How can controlled studies and statistics take into account the close, hour-to-hour relationship between the young patient, his playmates, his parents, and the attending physician? These relationships are best brought http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

WHAT SHOULD THE CHILD WITH LEUKEMIA BE TOLD?

American Journal of Diseases of Children , Volume 110 (6) – Dec 1, 1965

WHAT SHOULD THE CHILD WITH LEUKEMIA BE TOLD?

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract To the Editor: For a time the correspondence section of the major pediatric journals was unfortunately devoid of nonscientific controversy. A few years back the principal topic centered around the increasing dissatisfaction of a number of pediatricians with the practice of pediatrics. I trust these gentlemen have resolved their problem satisfactorily...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1965 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1965.02090030732027
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract To the Editor: For a time the correspondence section of the major pediatric journals was unfortunately devoid of nonscientific controversy. A few years back the principal topic centered around the increasing dissatisfaction of a number of pediatricians with the practice of pediatrics. I trust these gentlemen have resolved their problem satisfactorily to allow the rest of us to continue. In the horizon there now looms the question of what should be told a child who has leukemia. Most of the advice is coming from "large" centers in the form of generalizations based on "controlled studies," "statistics," and the like. How can the subject of impending death, as it relates to a child, be anything but a personal and intimate matter? How can controlled studies and statistics take into account the close, hour-to-hour relationship between the young patient, his playmates, his parents, and the attending physician? These relationships are best brought

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 1, 1965

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