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What Role Rheumatology?

What Role Rheumatology? Abstract Rothschild's editorial (p 26) directly identifies the generally poor training and limited interest of primary care practitioners toward the complaints of their patients about arthritis. The problem is not a new one. It dates back to the time of Osler, who reportedly claimed "when the arthritic comes in the front door, the doctor wants to go out the back door." Despite the nihilistic attitude reflected, paradoxically, it is now rheumatoid arthritis and related crippling disorders that are the chief cause of disability and work time loss in the United States. Is the answer then, as Rothschild suggests, to train a corps of practicing practitioners by bringing them back to educational institutions for six months to a year to correct this problem? I think not. Although Stross and Bole1 have described a four-month program at the University of Michigan Arthritis Center, Ann Arbor, for such a purpose, they realistically have References 1. Stross J, Bole G: The impact of community-based continuing medical education on the management of rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis Rheum 1980;23:753.Crossref 2. Roth S: New Directions in Arthritis Therapy . Littleton, Mass, PSG Publishing Co, 1980. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

What Role Rheumatology?

Abstract

Abstract Rothschild's editorial (p 26) directly identifies the generally poor training and limited interest of primary care practitioners toward the complaints of their patients about arthritis. The problem is not a new one. It dates back to the time of Osler, who reportedly claimed "when the arthritic comes in the front door, the doctor wants to go out the back door." Despite the nihilistic attitude reflected, paradoxically, it is now rheumatoid arthritis and related crippling...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1982 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1982.00340140029007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Rothschild's editorial (p 26) directly identifies the generally poor training and limited interest of primary care practitioners toward the complaints of their patients about arthritis. The problem is not a new one. It dates back to the time of Osler, who reportedly claimed "when the arthritic comes in the front door, the doctor wants to go out the back door." Despite the nihilistic attitude reflected, paradoxically, it is now rheumatoid arthritis and related crippling disorders that are the chief cause of disability and work time loss in the United States. Is the answer then, as Rothschild suggests, to train a corps of practicing practitioners by bringing them back to educational institutions for six months to a year to correct this problem? I think not. Although Stross and Bole1 have described a four-month program at the University of Michigan Arthritis Center, Ann Arbor, for such a purpose, they realistically have References 1. Stross J, Bole G: The impact of community-based continuing medical education on the management of rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis Rheum 1980;23:753.Crossref 2. Roth S: New Directions in Arthritis Therapy . Littleton, Mass, PSG Publishing Co, 1980.

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1982

References