Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

What Matters the Most to Adult Women With Acne?

What Matters the Most to Adult Women With Acne? Opinion EDITORIAL Diane Thiboutot, MD; Andrea Zaenglein, MD; Alison M. Layton, MB, ChB Acne is the eighth most prevalent disease worldwide, and physically in many cases as having completely clear skin over its negative health-related quality-of-life consequences are time or a manageable number of blemishes. The most salient 1,2 seen across all ages. Traditionally, patient preferences are terms with regard to treatment success were clear skin, no scarring, and no acne. Some patients regarded the resolution not often considered in designing an acne treatment plan, which can lead to negative effects on adherence and patient of the social and emotional repercussions of having acne as a satisfaction. measure of successful treatment, particularly in their profes- Dermatologists and researchers manage acne and con- sional lives, emphasizing the profound effect of acne on work duct clinical trials by assessing what they assume to be im- and relationships. Many women described difficulty in find- portant to patients. The status quo, however, is changing with ing a dermatologist who listened or considered their past recognition of the importance of engaging patients in a meth- experiences with acne treatment and included them in devel- odologically sound process to oping a management plan right for http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Dermatology American Medical Association

What Matters the Most to Adult Women With Acne?

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/what-matters-the-most-to-adult-women-with-acne-MwE76C5kZD
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2021 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2168-6068
eISSN
2168-6084
DOI
10.1001/jamadermatol.2021.2184
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Opinion EDITORIAL Diane Thiboutot, MD; Andrea Zaenglein, MD; Alison M. Layton, MB, ChB Acne is the eighth most prevalent disease worldwide, and physically in many cases as having completely clear skin over its negative health-related quality-of-life consequences are time or a manageable number of blemishes. The most salient 1,2 seen across all ages. Traditionally, patient preferences are terms with regard to treatment success were clear skin, no scarring, and no acne. Some patients regarded the resolution not often considered in designing an acne treatment plan, which can lead to negative effects on adherence and patient of the social and emotional repercussions of having acne as a satisfaction. measure of successful treatment, particularly in their profes- Dermatologists and researchers manage acne and con- sional lives, emphasizing the profound effect of acne on work duct clinical trials by assessing what they assume to be im- and relationships. Many women described difficulty in find- portant to patients. The status quo, however, is changing with ing a dermatologist who listened or considered their past recognition of the importance of engaging patients in a meth- experiences with acne treatment and included them in devel- odologically sound process to oping a management plan right for

Journal

JAMA DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 28, 2021

References