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What Is the Nature of Psychomotor Epilepsy?

What Is the Nature of Psychomotor Epilepsy? Abstract The study of a case from a family with four generations of abnormal behavior but with no convulsions is presented. Report of Case R. G., a 44-year-old married white man, was admitted to the Brooklyn State Hospital on March 4, 1955, with a history of "something like a brain attack." It was said that "he feels well for a while, then has an attack."He had gone to Florida the previous January because he wanted to try out a system for winning at horse racing. He became irrational and hyperactive at his hotel and had to be hospitalized. Subsequently, he was returned to New York to a receiving hospital and transferred to Brooklyn State Hospital. He claimed amnesia for a great part of the weeks in Florida and his behavior prior to admission to Brooklyn State Hospital.He had been previously hospitalized at Brooklyn State Hospital on Jan. 30, 1953. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Neurology & Psychiatry American Medical Association

What Is the Nature of Psychomotor Epilepsy?

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1958 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6886
DOI
10.1001/archneurpsyc.1958.02340120096014
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The study of a case from a family with four generations of abnormal behavior but with no convulsions is presented. Report of Case R. G., a 44-year-old married white man, was admitted to the Brooklyn State Hospital on March 4, 1955, with a history of "something like a brain attack." It was said that "he feels well for a while, then has an attack."He had gone to Florida the previous January because he wanted to try out a system for winning at horse racing. He became irrational and hyperactive at his hotel and had to be hospitalized. Subsequently, he was returned to New York to a receiving hospital and transferred to Brooklyn State Hospital. He claimed amnesia for a great part of the weeks in Florida and his behavior prior to admission to Brooklyn State Hospital.He had been previously hospitalized at Brooklyn State Hospital on Jan. 30, 1953.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of Neurology & PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 1, 1958

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