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What Is Important About a Study of Within-Group Differences of 'Cocaine Babies'?

What Is Important About a Study of Within-Group Differences of 'Cocaine Babies'? Abstract THE Article by Hofkosh and colleagues1 in this month's Archives is important primarily because of the approach that underlies its null results. Although this study had no control group, it makes a contribution by presenting a different and much needed way of looking at prenatal exposure to drugs. Children of drugabusing mothers recently have been described in the lay press by expressions such as "without the human emotions of empathy," "so hyperactive as to be unmanageable in the regular classroom," and doomed to become "sociopaths." Medical professionals can bring these assumptions and judgments to the care of families with a substance-abusing parent, compromising their ability to see the individual strengths and needs of parents and children. In the study by Hofkosh et al,1 the strengths of many of the mothers and children are evident. For the 144 cocaine-abusing mothers and their infants, the mean developmental score of References 1. Hofkosh D, Pringle JL, Wald HP, Switala J, Hinderliter SA, Hamel SC. Early interactions oetween drug-involved mothers and infants: within-group differences . Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med . 1995;149:665-672.Crossref 2. Barnard KE. Nursing Child Assessment Feeding Scales . Seattle, Wash: Nursing Child Assessment Satellite Training Publications; 1978. 3. Caldwell BM. The Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment Inventory: Birth to Three Years . Seattle, Wash: Nursing Child Assessment Satellite Training Publications; 1978. 4. Chasnoff L, Griffith D, Freir C, Murray J. Cocaine/polydrug use in pregnancy: two-year follow-up . Pediatrics . 1992;89:284-289. 5. Bayley N. Bayley Scales of Infant Development . New York, NY: The Psychological Corp; 1969. 6. Sameroff AJ, Fiese BH. Transactional regulation and early intervention . In: Meisels SJ, Shonkoff JP, eds. Handbook of Early Childhood Intervention . Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press; 1990:119-149. 7. American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Revised Third Edition . Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association; 1987. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine American Medical Association

What Is Important About a Study of Within-Group Differences of 'Cocaine Babies'?

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
1072-4710
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1995.02170190073013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract THE Article by Hofkosh and colleagues1 in this month's Archives is important primarily because of the approach that underlies its null results. Although this study had no control group, it makes a contribution by presenting a different and much needed way of looking at prenatal exposure to drugs. Children of drugabusing mothers recently have been described in the lay press by expressions such as "without the human emotions of empathy," "so hyperactive as to be unmanageable in the regular classroom," and doomed to become "sociopaths." Medical professionals can bring these assumptions and judgments to the care of families with a substance-abusing parent, compromising their ability to see the individual strengths and needs of parents and children. In the study by Hofkosh et al,1 the strengths of many of the mothers and children are evident. For the 144 cocaine-abusing mothers and their infants, the mean developmental score of References 1. Hofkosh D, Pringle JL, Wald HP, Switala J, Hinderliter SA, Hamel SC. Early interactions oetween drug-involved mothers and infants: within-group differences . Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med . 1995;149:665-672.Crossref 2. Barnard KE. Nursing Child Assessment Feeding Scales . Seattle, Wash: Nursing Child Assessment Satellite Training Publications; 1978. 3. Caldwell BM. The Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment Inventory: Birth to Three Years . Seattle, Wash: Nursing Child Assessment Satellite Training Publications; 1978. 4. Chasnoff L, Griffith D, Freir C, Murray J. Cocaine/polydrug use in pregnancy: two-year follow-up . Pediatrics . 1992;89:284-289. 5. Bayley N. Bayley Scales of Infant Development . New York, NY: The Psychological Corp; 1969. 6. Sameroff AJ, Fiese BH. Transactional regulation and early intervention . In: Meisels SJ, Shonkoff JP, eds. Handbook of Early Childhood Intervention . Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press; 1990:119-149. 7. American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Revised Third Edition . Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association; 1987.

Journal

Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1995

References